Monthly Archives: January 2018

2018 USA Cycling Fatbike Nationals

On February 10, 2018 USA Cycling’s Fatbike Nationals returns to Grand Rapids, Michigan AND to a new venue at Cannonsburg Ski Are

Check out more details at FatbikeNats.com

Kona Sales Rep Dale Plant

Celebrate winter fat biking and come check out Fat Bike Nationals, whether you want to give the race(s) a go or just watch, it will be a great time for all! There will be a party atmosphere with a live band and plenty of adult beverages by Founders Brewing on Saturday evening from 7:30-10.  This is the second year in a row the USA Cycling Fat Bike National Championships are in G.R.

As if Nationals weren’t enough, there is another race at the same venue on Sunday with Winter Rush

( https://www.facebook.com/events/314789045664341/ )

Open to all racers and it’s a fundraiser for West Michigan MTB Alliance.

PLUS you will also have a chance to meet current IMBA Executive Director and mountain bike legend Dave Wiens!

While you’re in the area be sure to swing by Central District Cyclery and check out the latest Kona offerings.

Kona in the Pinkbike Photo of the Year Contest

It’s time for Pinkbike’s annual photo of the year contest, where readers select their favorite photos from 2017. This year a photo of Kona’s communication’s manager made it through to the contest! Shot days before Christmas aboard a Kona Process 153 CR DL, Lacy Kemp and Bellingham photographer Erik Mickelson wrapped her bike in Christmas lights to play with some cool long exposure effects. Her photo is one of only two that feature female riders, so we’re pushing this one #ferdagirls!

Head on over to Pinkbike and give the photo a vote! Let’s see if we can make it through to finals!

Hashtag Enduro + DYEDBro = One Rad Process

When Iago Garay isn’t styling it up on the EWS circuit winning practice, he is producing super sweet protective frame wraps via his Do You Even Drift Bro company. Recently Norwegian based Kona fan and Hashtag Enduro member Mads Oliver went and rolled the dice on a tie-dyed DYEDBro frame protector for this brand new 27.5 Process 153 CR DL, we think you’ll agree that the result is freaking awesome! I would not be surprised if we see more DYEDBro Process bikes around as a result.

Want to get your own DYEDBro frame protector kit for your Kona? Head here now.

Experiencing Haleakala

Dale Plant helped build the custom Kona Blasts for Maui Bike Tours

Recently one of our sales reps, Dale Plant, took the trek to his Hawaiian territory on Maui to pay a visit to some of his dealers including Maui Bike Tours, located in Hakiu. Just like the poem. Maui Bike Tours specialize in the famous Haleakala Volcano descent, featuring self-guided tours down Maui’s massive volcano. Constantly listed as a must-see attraction on Maui, the tour starts with a shuttle up to almost 9,000 feet where guests can experience incredible views. The actual self-guided portion of the tour starts lower, at around 6,000 feet. The idea is that instead of making people have to keep one certain pace while descending they can go as fast or slow as they’d like.

Kona’s association is massive as Maui Bike Tours recently outfitted their rental fleet with 300 custom Kona Blasts. Maui Bike Tours were looking for something reliable with good brakes, durable tires, comfortable to ride, and simple to operate. All bikes are outfitted with a 1x drivetrain to keep shifting simple and intuitive for their guests. A gorgeous Burnt Matt Orange paint job was applied to keep with the tropical theme. Dale and his wife Laura took the Blasts out of for a test run with the tour and raved about the scenery. “When it’s clear, you can see forever,” Plant said. “It’s like riding down from the top of the world. The bikes felt great, too. They’re the perfect tool for the job!”

For more information on Maui Bike Tours, be sure to check out their website.

Life in The Loops With Soren Farenholtz

Words and photos by Dylan Sherrard

It was only a few short years ago when Soren Farenholtz found himself falling in love with biking. In the spring of 2014, he and his childhood friends would spend their days digging small jumps behind his house, converting the family treehouse into their bike store, ‘RAD REPAIR,’ and generally “grommin’ out,” as Soren says it.

And as the story so often goes, imagination and a thirst for adventure lead Soren and his friends to longer days of exploring the edges of their neighbourhood in search of bigger jumps and longer trails. It was during one of these outings that Soren stumbled across the Kamloops Bike Ranch, completely by chance.

“I was blown away,” Soren recalls, “I saw kids riding all these huge jumps, and I thought it was just nuts. I remember thinking I was going to fall off a cliff or something. I was scared at first.”

Soren returned home that night, unable to shake the sights of the Bike Ranch from his imagination. He went back to the Ranch soon after and began picking his way through the smaller jump lines. Within a few visits, he was riding through a whole six-set, making new friends, and finding a place in the scene of older, more experienced riders.

And although it’s been just a few short years, Soren already appears mature on a bike with smooth and effortless style in every regard. He rolls around the Ranch with a heavy flow and ease, a deeper bag of tricks than we’ve ever seen for a Kamloops kid, and a level-headed attitude that makes you want to be around him.

The summer of 2017 was a season of huge progression for Soren, which saw that bag of tricks padded to the brim. He learned every 360 variation you can imagine, backflips, 720s, and anything else you can add a barspin to.

Soren’s rapid progression matches the rapid pace with which his generation digests media content. They are growing up in a social media world where they have, in their pockets, the tools to manufacture their own content, dictate their own image, and see things the way they want to see them.

“Insta is more, like, I look at it more than actual edits,” Soren confesses. “It’s easier, watching friends who live in different towns. It’s easier to scroll through. And making my own edits is fun. Not as many people see a big edit on a website. But all the followers see it on IG, and comment, and it gets me stoked to know my friends are watching.”

That style of constant, yet casual, production, makes weekly progression feel normal. Soren can watch what his favourite riders are doing, practice it on the airbag, move from the airbag to a trick jump with a soft landing, and dial it in. He can watch himself in slow motion, adjust his approach, and then take it to any other jump in the park, all in the span of a few days.

Despite such a rapid and progressive learning curve, Soren maintains that style is paramount.

“I don’t really see the point in having a trick unless you really have the trick, you know?” Soren mentions in regard to the routine he tries to keep in tune with.

He doesn’t want to be one of those riders that can whip out anything in their imagination, but only on a soft trick jump. So most days at the Ranch, Soren rattles off a trick list in a certain sequence and reaps the rewards of repetition, always pushing to make it feel easier. Soren wants his tricks to feel dialled, and to feel attainable on any jump, at any time.

“I’m so much less likely to get injured that way,” adds Soren, “having that air awareness of every little detail of a trick, and knowing how to bail from it feels really important for learning.”

 A wise note for a young lad on a tear.

But trick lists and the topic of self-preservation are not the only areas in which Soren displays fleeting moments of wisdom beyond his years. He’s also quick to note his appreciation for the Kamloops community and the Bike Ranch he rides every day.

“I wouldn’t be into riding the same way without the Ranch,” says Soren. “It’s so crazy that we can just go there and ride for free. I mean, if it cost, say twenty bucks to go and check it out, I probably wouldn’t have ended up riding there by accident. Brad makes the place truly dialed, but me and my friends all feel responsible to look after the jumps, too.”

“Kamloops is such a good town,” Soren continues. “Some of my older friends are moving away for school and work and stuff, but it’s still such a good riding scene. Kamloops is a legendary biking town. My friends and I, we’re all into more tricks. I think Kamloops is used to seeing all the big hits. We don’t go as big, but we’re riding with tricks that are a little more technical. I think it’s cool to be part of a younger generation sort of making our own chapter. Doing it our way.”

Soren finds confidence and inspiration in abundance, living in a town where many happy careers and healthy lifestyles have been found in mountain biking. 
At just fifteen years young, with such a deep bag of tricks and such a level head on his shoulders, Soren Farenholtz is a Kamloops grom truly poised to blow it up big time. And the most exciting aspect is that he doesn’t really care to be caught up in the hype around any of that.

Catch Soren on Instagram.

Ti Tuesday: Kjetil’s Ti Honzo

This week’s Ti Tuesday comes all the way from Oslo, Norway, it’s proof that taste knows no bounds.
Kjetil wanted to build a playful bike, his friends told him he should be looking at a full suspension, but he knew better. After an exhaustive hour-long online search he knew he’d found his new bike.  The Ti Honzo hit him like “Lightning from the clear sky. I would have to have it”!

“This is probably the most fun bike I’ve ever had, it’s extremely playful. I wanted a hardtail that behaved like a full suspension bike, I’ve always been a hardtail boy. I love the geometry and appearance.”

He first built the bike in October 2016 with the orange Hope parts as a starting point. In addition, there was the SRAM XO1 11 speed drivetrain, a Rock Shox Pike up front, Rock Shox seat post, Race Face handlebar and Easton ARC 30 wheels. The ARC’s morphed into the carbon Nexties after a little accident.

Kjetil also didn’t think the orange on the Honzo matched his parts so he set about making custom decals and removed all the orange from the frame, he even made a new custom steerer tube logo. The last upgrade was choosing the Maxxis skin wall tires. Now he’s just waiting for the snow to melt!

Scroll down for the full build details.

For more Ti Kona goodness, check out the Ti Tuesday archives and #TiTuesdaysWithKona on Instagram. If you’ve got a Ti Kona bike, please do get in touch!

 

Race Face Atlas 800mm 35mm rise
Fabric lock on grips
Hope am/freeride stem
Extralite top cap
Hope headset
Hope Tech 3 v4 brakes
Rock Shox pike rct3 140mm
Rock Shox Reverb stealth dropper post
WTB Volt seat
Hope seat clamp
Hope BB
Hope crank with spiderless chainring
KMC x11 SL DLC black chain
Spank Spike pedals
Hope Pro 4 hubs
Hope 200mm Disc rotor front
Hope 180mm Disc rotor back
Nextie carbon premium rims (36mm width)
DT Swiss competition spokes
DT Swiss brass nipels
Maxxis skinwall
Sram XO1 11 speed drivetrain

Bike Packing Tip: Making Your Own Handlebar Harness

Bikepacking isn’t new, but it’s certainly growing in popularity. We’ve shared our love of bikepacking with our Not Too Far From Home Videos and the with the launch of our Remote eBike.  If you’ve been considering dabbling in bikepacking, one of the more creative aspects to consider is how you’re going to carry all of your gear. A while back Bicycle Times Magazine posted a really clever DIY handlebar harness for your gear. They used a Hei Hei Trail DL in their write-up, but we offer a ton of bikes that are awesome for bikepacking. Check out the link to learn howto make your very own handlebar harness with only a couple dollars and a few supplies.

 

Considering venturing out on a bikepacking adventure? Be sure to check out the Unit, Unit X, Rove LTD, Big Honzo, Remote, or a Sutra LTD.

Kona Dream Build: Cole’s Shred-Worthy Process 153 AL/DL

Cole Brisson needed to replace his old Process 134 and chose to do that with our new Process 153 AL/Dl. Working like a true bicycle artist, Cole used the alloy Process frame as a blank canvas and splashed on some serious pops of color/bling. Industry Nine wheels, Cane Creek forks and meaty Maxxis rubber are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Cole’s very shred worthy build. Check out the full photoset below.

“This bike replaced my 134, which I loved, but the new 153 was just a little more suited to frequent summer trips out to the mountains. I’m a big fan of Industry Nine wheels, and they do some pretty rad ano colours, so had to go with some green bits there. I love the way the Cane Creek Helm rides, so that was an obvious choice, it’s really plush and just eats big hits. I really wanted to get the gold Eagle drivetrain on this bike, I then ended up getting the gold Chromag saddle and gold Cane Creek 110 to get a little bling going on elsewhere. I converted the Reverb over to the Wolf Tooth cable lever, I’m a big fan of the underbar set up there. I also put the stock 2.5 DHF on the rear and added a new 2.6 DHF on the front which I’ve found to be a really good combo for my riding style. I just tried to build a real shred-worthy bike, and I’m pretty stoked on the way it came out.”

Taking Advantage of the Golden Orb

It’s January. Typically, in the Pacific Northwest that means we’re drinking way too much coffee to stay warm, we’ve wrapped ourselves in Gortex and wool to stay dry, and we spend just as much time cleaning the mud off of our bikes as we do riding them. This is a familiar song and dance to me. Wake up, stare outside at the pitch black pelting rain and make an impulse decision on whether or not to trudge my way through another wet, soggy, coldAF ride. I’m about 50/50 on this one. Some mornings I do it because it’s the only time I’ll have to ride on that particular day. Other mornings, I convince myself that the extra 90 minutes of sleep is great for my sanity and crawl back into my bed cave.

However, each January there also seems to be this little nugget of magic that pierces through the seemingly impermeable thick gray blanket of wetness and bestows upon us a few gloriously sunny days. To the locals, these days are known as “Holy-shit-it’s-summer-in-January!” days. They are treasured the way a mother treasures her child’s first pair of shoes. They’ll be talked about throughout the rest of the dreary wet season (aka, until the sun shines again on July 5th). We’ll even reminisce about them next January when we get another round of gloriously brilliant golden light and crisp bluebird days.

 

This past dose of sunshine was felt all along the west coast as my Instagram feed slowly dissolved from muddy shins to gorgeous rays of light bursting through the trees on Mount Seymour on the North Shore, endless island views from the mountain tops of Bellingham, to golden-hour panoramas from the hilltops of Seattle and beyond. One thing is for sure, when the weather gives you roughly eight months of dark, cold and wet conditions, we definitely learn to take advantage of the sunny days whenever we have them.

Here’s to more random gorgeous days in the winter! Until then, I’m going to go wash the mud off of my bike from last night’s rain ride.

 

*Header image by Scott Mackay

Pinkbike Visits Kona HQ

Pat White walks Pinkbike through some older Kona models.

Yesterday the A/V team from Pinkbike stopped by for a visit to our world HQ in Ferndale, Washington. They wanted to take a good look at some of our models through the years dating all the way back to one of the brand’s original models before the company was even called Kona. Product managers Paddy White and Ian Schmitt walked the crew through the evolution of Kona’s line throughout our 30-year history and discussed the changes in trends and some of the reasons why we chose to make certain bikes.

An old Stab Dee-lux

Product Manager Ian Schmitt talking about the Cowan

Stay tuned to Pinkbike and the Cog for the final video to come out later this winter!