Monthly Archives: March 2018

Kona Dream Builds: Garry’s Satori DL

Garry has a history with Kona and a history with the Satori, when he heard that we were planning on bringing back the model he knew he had to get his hands on one.


Seven years ago he bought the first edition of the Satori, it was on this bike that he completed the 2012 BC Bike Race, a proper bucket list event and a week that Garry will never forget. The bike had a good race career back in Ireland afterwards in local enduro events before being placed aside.

“I remember the bike as a great all-rounder with a suspension set-up that was ideal for Irish riding conditions. I have lots of memories wrapped up in the Satori and couldn’t wait to get my hands on the new one.”

Garry has customized his Satori DL with the same component mix as on many of his previous Kona builds.

The cockpit consists of Kona bars clamped by a Hope Stem paired with the trusty Hope headset to keep out the Irish weather. Ergon grips and saddle complete the contact points along with CrankBrothers Mallet E pedals. The drivetrain is SRAM Eagle 1 x 12 turned by Hope Cranks on a Hope BB.

There’s a CrankBrothers Highline dropper post held in place by a Hope seatclamp.

An RRP front mudguard keeps the worst of the dirt off and he’s tweaked the fork performance with an MRP Ramp Control cartridge.

Braking is done via by Hope tech 3 levers biting on Hope floating rotors. Wheels are Reynolds Black Label rims on i9 Hubs. Maxxis Minion Semi Slick rear tyre and DHF 2.3 front filled with Orange Seal sealant.

Bicycling Magazine Loves the Process

“Whether you’re on slow technical trails or high-speed terrain littered with loose, rocky ruts, the 153 is predictable, balanced, and easy to control.”

-Daniel Sapp, Bicycling Magazine

This week Bicycling listed seven reasons why they love the Kona Process! We think it’s pretty great too, but we may be a little biased. Check out their full list here

If you haven’t seen our videos featuring the Process, be sure to check them out!

 

Ali and Hannah absolutely shredding on the Process 153 CR.

A little love from the Alps!

Squamish riding at its finest!

Spring Ahead(set)

Praise be the longer evening light and lifting of the dark, dank veil of the northern winter. Not only do we northern-hemisphereans have an extra hour (and building) of daylight at the end of the day, we also (hopefully) have several minutes less of bike washing to do after our rides. That is assuming that conditions where you live will dry up a bit… Regardless, if you live anywhere north of the 39th N. parallel, chances are you are thinking about more ride time, dry or wet, and therefore a much needed ‘spring cleaning’ for your trusty two-wheeled friend who ushered you through the last four or five months of muck.

The best option for a spring clean is your favorite bike shop. Second to that, some of us have the time, interest and ability to do the full deep clean of every single moving part. If neither of those apply to you, then it’s likely that your simpler D.I.Y. checklist will include: a little polish (mmmm), fresh set of cables and housing (for sure), drivetrain parts (that fit the budget), and brake pads (if you haven’t changed them a few times already). Here’s one more, especially for you mountain bikers (and anyone else who doesn’t ride with full wrap fenders): Replace your headset, too!

Headset, new & used

If you are riding the same headset that you rode in all of last summer, give it a test to see if it is worn out. To test, remove your front wheel and place your bike in a work stand, or balance vertically on the rear wheel. Rotate the fork by gently holding one hand on one end of the handlebar. Do you feel any crunchy-crunchy? How about a “notch” when your handlebars are facing straight forward? If you feel any of these things, then your steering and bike handling are being affected. This is likely coming from the lower bearing, which gets blasted with gallons of filth all winter (not to mention higher loads). Some servicing is certainly possible (clean out with solvent, re-pack w/ new grease, etc.), but if it’s been as long as most people go without servicing their headsets (12+months), then $40-ish+ will be well-spent on a new one, and it will have your bike feeling extra nimble and precise for spring. Think of how good a “new” bike feels. Much of this comes from all of the bearings/pivots being at the lowest friction state of their lifespan.

Extra nimble you say? Consider this: the headset is what actually allows a bicycle to be balanced. Take away a bike’s ability to steer and it becomes unrideable. All of the micro-steering (rotation) in the headset is what enables controlled riding at any speed. Therefore, any crunchiness in a headset, or worse, pitting or notching, takes away from a bike’s innate stability, agility and precision. A bicycle is balanced by steering in a left-right direction while rolling forward (even with no conscious steering input from the rider). This steering accelerates the support of the bicycle laterally, enabling the gyroscopic force of the rotating wheels to change heading and stay upright, thus assisting a rider to balance.

So, there you have it. Add a fresh headset to your “spring cleaning” repertoire, a small cost for a (likely) big improvement in that “fresh” bike feeling. Happy spring riding!

 

 

Ryan Gardner reports from Mexico’s Trans Puerto Vallarta

With the major portion of the enduro race season still a few months away but a month or two of training already on the books, Becky and I decided to head south for a few days and check out the Trans Puerto Vallarta. The Trans PV was new this year and included some awesome trails we had already ridden in the little mountain town of Mascota Mexico. We were also treated to some new trails in San Sabastian and mountains surrounding Puerta Vallarta. The whole race took four days with travel to Mascota and included 15 special stages. It was the perfect opportunity to test new bikes, dial in suspension, and shake off the cobwebs from a few months away from racing. Plus, it’s hard to say no to warm temps, tacos, and those chill Mexican vibes.

After flying into PV we built up bikes including my brand new Process 153 29”. I only had one day on this monster before I crammed its big wheels into my Evoc bag, but I had already set a few PR’s on my home trails. This bike breathes fire.

 

After a bike building session, 5-6 tacos, and a margarita (It’s ok to go full gringo) we were off to bed and excited to travel to San Sabastian the next day.

 

The trails of San Sabastian (and neighboring Mascota) are old. Really old. Most of the trails we raced are leftover mining trails and roads from the 1700’s. Even the estate where we camped for the first two nights was built sometime around 1750 and was the center of gold and other mineral mining for the surrounding areas. From here, mules carried the valuable metals down to the Puerto Vallarta so they could be exported. From these ancient paths, the riders of Mexico have reclaimed (sometimes very) narrow single tracks. This, coupled with the dry season, made for some exiting blind racing as riders struggled to find speed, traction, and flow throughout the day. Ryan had a solid day placing second behind good friend and training partner Cory Sullivan by just one second, and ahead of the rest of the field by over 30 seconds. Becky crushed the first four stages before taking a big crash, splitting her knee open, and taking a stem to the sternum. Even with the crash, she finished the day in first place.

Once back to camp, riders were treated to cervecas and a mountain of carnitas. This particular combination results in near instantaneous sleep. Not even the snoring of racers and barking of extremely photogenic Mexican dogs could keep us awake.

Day two of racing saw us move to the steep and fast trails of Mascota. The tracks here are varied and include some wide open sections, some incredibly tight switchbacks, and some pretty gnarly rock gardens. It was in the latter that I made a critical error. My Process 153 had been egging me on all day, seemingly frustrated by my pace. The whole bike comes alive at speed and it’s a constant battle to keep things under control on a trail you have never ridden. I got just a little too excited in one gnarly rock garden and instead of rolling a 4ft boulder, I pulled up and hucked out towards a side hill hoping to keep some speed. Unfortunately, I landed juuuuust a bit to the right and clipped a knife-edged rock which put a 2.5-inch slice in my tough casing WTB vigilante. It was an immediate flat for me and a 30-minute time loss as I finagled a fix to get me back to town. After some Mexican ingenuity and the incredible durability of my Vigilante, I was able to get it patched up and win 3 of the 4 remaining stages including a super tight trail on which my “dinosaur bike” was supposed to be slow.

 

Becky, denouncing stitches which would have taken her out of the race, soldiered on to the amazement of everyone in the field. Rocking last season’s Process 134 and fueled by ice cream stops and adorable Mexican puppies, she rallied through the day only losing one spot on the timesheet by day’s end.


That night we set up camp at a beautiful ranch outside Mascota. There was only one cold shower, but the home-cooked food and late night pizza delivery made up for it. Talking that evening with friend and event promoter Alvaro Gutierrez Leal, he confided that the next morning’s transfer to the stages was what he was most worried about. It was a three-hour drive through 4×4 roads, in two-wheel drive Toyota vans. Turns out he was right. After a few sketchy river crossings and putting some serious wear on the clutch plate, we arrived in the coastal mountains above Puerto Vallarta.
Where the first two days were loose, these trails were on another level of negative traction. No front breaking here. Every stage of the day was wide open with almost no traction, some sand, and scary off-camber corners. We were also given some “Mexican surprises,” like a trail that enters a backyard, loops around a house, and then exits through the front gate. A flock of chickens presented a few opportunities for nose-bawks.

After finishing on a steep and sandy track known as El Scorpion we gathered together for a chill ride back to the ocean, buckets of beers, more tacos, and a bit of Raicilla (the traditional liquor Mascota made from wild agave and brewed in backyard stills). Due to the tire fiasco, Ryan finished off the podium. Becky finished the race in second place, injury and all!

 

 

Photos by Nico Switalski

Words by Ryan Gardner

 

 

The Demo Tour is Rolling to Arizona, Nevada, and Florida!

The 2018 Kona Demo Tour is making stops in Arizona, Las Vegas, and Florida this week! Check out details below and come test ride a new Process 153 CR 27.5Process 153 AL/DL 29, Hei Hei Trail CRHonzo AL/DL or the brand new Satori DL!

We will also be at Moses Creek in St. Augustine, Florida on Saturday, March 17th from 10am-4pm. Contact A1A Cycle Works for more information.

On Sunday, March 18th, we’ll be at Tillie Fowler Park in Jacksonville from 10am to 4pm. Contact Zen Cog for more information.

For the west coast stops, we’ll be hitting the Brownlow Trails at Pioneer Park in Prescott, AZ this Friday from 12-4pm. Check in with  Manzanita Outfitters for details.

Planning to hit Vegas this weekend? Don’t miss us on Sunday at Twilight! Details below!

Disco Process

It’s International Women’s Day and we’re celebrating by showing off some of our favorite lady rippers, Hannah Bergemann and Ali Osgood. Hannah and Ali are riding the Kona Process 153 CR, a bike made for everyone- men, women, Wookies, you name it. Thanks to all of the amazing female athletes and industry heavy hitters that keep us rolling!

Hannah Bergemann

Ali Osgood

 


Video by Axl Fostvedt and Joonas Vinnari
Photos by Caleb Smith
Awesome riding by Ali Osgood and Hannah Bergemann

Race Report From Australian National Championships

This past weekend Australian National Downhill Championships were held in Bright.

Leading the way for Kona was Connor Fearon, who, unfortunately, suffered some pretty bad luck throughout the weekend. He crashed in practice and suffered a nasty gash in his elbow. Not to be phased by the injury, he went on to race but suffered a flat tire in his run. He finished the race in 8th place. Not the result he was looking for Connor is happy to have that weekend out of the way and is excited to move forward with the core of the season.

On the ladies side, Tegan Molloy had a stellar weekend finishing second behind 10-time champion Tracy Hannah aboard her Operator. Congrats on a great weekend, Tegan!

All photos courtesy of @kaneophoto

Kona Dream Builds

Do you have a stunning, custom Kona? Does it have custom parts or maybe a special paint job? We’d love to see it! We’re looking for submissions for Dream Build feature that we share on the Cog and on our social channels. While we know everyone loves their Kona, we’re looking for people who take the extra step in making their bike truly unique.

If you’ve got something special, let’s see it! Upload your Dream Builds to Facebook or Instagram with the tag #KonaDreamBuilds and if it fits the criteria we’ll reach out to you for details!

Check out some examples:

This gorgeous Rove LTD

Or this killer Honzo ST

or this pumpkin Operator

We’ve got more Dream Builds coming soon! Could yours be next?

Toni Lund’s Thousand Mile Quest

It’s March in Alaska. The temperature hovers at minus 25 degrees Fahrenheit. You’ve been traveling alone and mostly unsupported for nearly 5 days across Alaska’s frozen tundra by bike. You’ve made it 250 miles so far. You’ve still got 750 to go. The weather? Unpredictable at best. Companionship? Let’s just say it’s lonely out there.

Welcome to the Iditarod Trail Invitational, a 1000 mile point to point race and pure test of mettle.

Athletes set off on February 25th for the world’s longest winter ultra race. One of only 19 people to attempt the full 1000 miles this year is Finnish athlete Toni Lund, who is riding a Kona Wo.

It’s fascinating to follow along with Toni’s progress on the race tracker located here: http://www.iditarodtrailinvitational.com/tracking

As of this posting, Toni currently sits in 5th place, 11 miles behind the current leader. Anything can happen between now and projected remaining 11 days of racing, so be sure to stay tuned to the tracker for Toni’s progress. You can check out all of Toni’s race preparation on his Facebook page.

We’re cheering for you, Toni!