Daily Archives: 08/22/2018

Check out our Updated 2019 Dew’s

The Kona Dew line of bikes is the rock to your everyday roll. No matter the weather, no matter the day, no matter the traffic, urban obstacles, or whether you’re in a suit, jeans, or skirt, the dew is what gets you there. The dew is designed with your commute or daily grinds in mind, and smartly spec’d to ensure you’ve got the speed, stopping power, and comfort expected from a perfect city bike.

Urban riding isn’t about simply getting from point A to point B. The truly seasoned know that an efficient drivetrain, fenders, and hydraulic disc brakes are the ticket to efficiency and speed. Running on 650b wheels, weatherproofed by fenders, and powered by a SRAM NX 1×11 drivetrain, the  Dr Dew has everything a seasoned, knowledgeable rider could want in a bike.


When searching for a bike that is the ultimate commuting machine, look no further than the Dew Deluxe. Fast 650b wheels take this refined ride through every type of weather with confidence. Prepackaged with fenders and a rear rack, the Dew Deluxe is your grocery getting, commute-smashing urban road destroyer!


You know what you want in a city bike. A comfortable saddle atop a durable frame, strong Tektro hydraulic disc brakes, a 9-speed Shimano drivetrain, and quality Shimano cranks make the Dew Plus the choice for commuters that are looking for a dependable bike in an affordable package.


The Dew is as classic to the Kona lineup as a fedora is to a Havana night. Comfort, simplicity, and efficiency are at the forefront of the Dew. Equipped with Tektro disc brakes, the Dew has exceptional stopping power, whether that’s while bombing down a hill, or perfecting your skids.


Welcome to your freedom. The Dew City is the perfect machine to get you around town in style and with ease. With a strong, dependable aluminum frame and steel fork, comfortable touchpoints for saddle and grips, the Dew City is the perfectly affordable city bike.

Kona Dream Builds: Ride Here Now, Ryan’s Light Touring Kona Rove

For today’s Kona Dream Builds post we are doing something a little different. We are going to send you somewhere else to check it out! Well, not before whetting your appetite with few inspiring photos and words. BikePacking.com recently profiled Denver based Ryan Santoski and his Kona Rove in their Riders and Rigs series and it’s an inspirational little story. Ryan runs Totem Cyclery, a service-based shop in Denver, CO. and he practices Zen and the art of bicycle maintenance on a daily basis. His shop motto Ride Here Now “is a concept I try to practice daily, the act of simplifying and cutting away the unessential to get to the heart of the thing, whatever that thing may be. The process and style of such matters; paying attention to our immediate surroundings equally so.”

We’ve posted an excerpt from Bike Packing’s story below and a few photos but you really need to head here to check out the full in-depth post that just may have you wanting to drop everything and start your own niche repair workshop!

BikePacking.com: I love your bike, it seems like a dream commuter and tourer. Why the Kona Rove?
Ryan: Its steel frame with disc brakes and big tire clearance make it a quiver killer. I use it as my daily rider, take it on longer road/adventure rides, can load it up for touring, and rip it on gravel and dirt trails. It’s comfortable enough for all-day riding but also feels nimble and responsive – sometimes I like to go fast and it seems to react to that quite well, too.

BikePacking.com: Talk us through a few of your favorite components and accessories on the build.
Ryan: The SON/Edelux Dynamo system has been my favorite upgrade, and I love the rack-mounted light. Getting the beam out in front eliminates shadow from the front wheel and I can still carry anything on the rack without interference. As far as accessories, the Sturdy Bag Designs frame bag really ties everything together – Joe is a dear friend and this was one of the first frame bags he built when starting Sturdy. Despite being courted by many other makers, I only carry two bikepacking bag brands at the shop: Sturdy and John Campbell aka Alpine Luddites out of Ouray, Colorado. I think they do some of the best work in the industry and both have personal resonance with me.

 

Hannah Bergemann’s First EWS

Words by Kona Supreme, Hannah Bergemann

I successfully finished my first EWS at Whistler last weekend. It was such a cool experience to ride and race with some of the world’s best in one of the best places!

Some highlights of the weekend started with practice on Friday and Saturday. I got to ride some amazing and classic Whistler trails in the bike park and in the valley with people from all over the world. Some rain on Saturday evening made for some tacky dirt and helped hold off the dust for the race.

Race day started with a pedal through the village over to the Blackcomb trails. I was nervous about making my start time and pedaled maybe a little too quickly up the steep road to Microclimate for stage 1. I rode conservatively on this stage with my nerves running pretty high, but rode clean and relatively smooth for such a technical trail.

Stage 2 brought us back up the road to Crazy Train, an even steeper, gnarlier version of stage 1, with more than a few big moves. I felt like I rode my best on this stage, passing a few people and riding clean on all the big features.

After pedaling around Lost Lake and getting stuck in a long line for the Creekside gondola, I rushed over to stage 3 and made my start time with a few minutes to spare. Stage 3 on Delayed Fuse was a bit of a contrast to the previous stages with some steep chutes and greasy roots. I made a few mistakes and ended the stage with a slightly crooked brake lever after a minor tumble in some wet roots.

After a short transfer, I started down stage 4. This stage had a bit more flow, a lot more pedaling than previous stages. I finished completely out of breath but had a clean run.

For the last stage, I took 3 different lifts and gondolas to get to the Top of the World. This stage started us across a suspension bridge hanging across two peaks. The final stage was expectedly brutal, descending 5500 feet from the Top of the World to the bottom of the bike park, and I was definitely low on steam at the end of the day. The top of the stage is basically a 3.5 mile long rock garden. After descending that, we still had to descend another 3000 feet all the way down the bike park (through some rather bump filled, dusty and blown out trails) to the base of the park where we started. When I finally finished the race, I had to peel my hands from the handlebars.

I ended up placing 25th overall, a solid midpack finish for my first EWS. My bike was running great all weekend despite taking some serious abuse on all the Whistler trails. Thanks to everyone for all the support this season!! Looking forward to trying some more big races next season!