Monthly Archives: November 2018

Kona Dream Builds: Mike’s Featherweight Big Honzo CR Punches Above its Weight

This featherweight 21 pound XC race weapon of a Big Honzo CR is Mikes second bike to be featured here on the Cog, his last one was one of the coolest Libre’s we have seen, and it seems with this Honzo CR he’s followed suit nicely. Ignoring the fact that there’s no dropper post (to each their own right), Jason from Chainline bikes has ensured that this bike ticks some pretty damn classic dream build check boxes. Enve stuff everywhere? Yes. Hope brakes? Yes. DT Swiss 350’s? Yes. XX1 Eagle? Hell Yes. Is there anything you’d change on this incredible build?

How rad is this front end, Fox Factory Float 34’s forks, DT Swiss 350 hubs mated to 29″ ENVE M525 Hoops which are shod with Goodyear’s new Escape Ultimate tires.

Hope X2 brakes with Race levers provide stopping power.

They are mounted on ENVE M5 bars and a ENVE M6 31.8mm stem. Cane Creek’s classic 110 headset keeps things turning smoothly.

XX1 Eagle. Nuff said.

DAMN…

Bike Rumor Post First Look at Libre DL

Bike Rumor‘s Zach Overholt is about to set off on a final bike packing trip to give their Libre test bike one last through shakedown before he posts his thoughts before Christmas.  So it seems like the perfect time to get reacquainted with the Libre via Bike Rumor’s original first look post from back in August.

You can check it out here and we’ll be sure to let you know when Zach posts his final impressions.

Kona Dream Builds: Sapphire and Steel, Garry’s Honzo ST

Right from the very start, Kona has been synonymous with steel bikes. From the Explosif of 1988, through to the mid 90’s Kilauea and to the present day Honzos, Sutras, and Roves, steel has always formed the backbone of the Kona range. Tange Prestige, Columbus Nivachrom or Reynolds 853, steel will always endure as the material of choice for a certain type of rider.

For Garry Davoren, working for Kona in Ireland and at Galway’s MBW Bike Shop he’s not short of choice when it comes to bikes to ride. “When it came time to build the perfect hardtail, I knew that there was only one place to start. With this black Kona Honzo ST frame. I have a problem though, I don’t know where to stop”.  He’s not wrong, this finished bike well and truly ticks all the Dream Build boxes.

Featuring a 130mm MRP RibbonAir Fork and blue Hope Tech gear everywhere (cranks, chainring, BB/Headset/seat clamp, stem).

Stopping duties are taken care of by the tried and trusted combo of Tech3 levers and four-piston calipers with matching blue floating rotors, naturally.

No ordinary shifting would do for this project so it had to be Shimano XTR Di2. Yes, that’s electronic shifting. On a hardcore hardtail. Did someone say old school? You’ll also notice the very custom drilling involved in making this set-up work including some tasty heat shrink to keep the cabling tidy.

Ergon GE1 Evo Factory grips on Raceface Turbine bars, Ergon SMC4 Gel Comp seat and CrankBrothers Mallet E pedals complete the contact points with a Crankbrothers Highline dropper to make sure that seat can get well out of the way when not required.

Reynolds TR249 wheels set up with 2.3 Maxxis DD Minion DHF up front and a similarly-sized DD Aggressor out back, both tubeless and sealed by OrangeSeal.

Kona Dream Builds: Danny Stewart’s GSD* Shonky ST

UK rider Danny Stewart isn’t really much of a bling merchant, he just rides really hard and Gets Shit Done*. He’s signed on for 2019 to ride for Hart’s Cyclery/Kona as part of Kona Europe’s Grassroots programme. Danny rides park, dirt, and demos throughout Scotland each year with the Clan Stunt Team. Look out for Danny this year at Dirt Wars events across the UK.

Like all good DJ bikes Danny’s Shonky is sporting a Pike DJ up front. The rear wheel is a Mavic EX729 rim laced to a Hope Pro4 Trials Hub with Sapim Race spokes, the front wheel? A random emergency front wheel from the shop. The wheels are shod with Maxxis DTHout the back and a Schwalbe Taple Top up front.

A  Truvativ Descendant crankset and Hope F20 pedals propel this solid functional DJ machine.

A classic parts bin Avid Elixir XO brake slows things down.

Road.CC Features the Libre DL in Their Drop Bar Review

Road.CC has featured the Libre DL as a top contender in 1x drop bar bikes. Have you tossed out the extra chainrings? What do you love about 1X?

“With its carbon fibre frame, 45mm tyres and massive selection of gear mounting points, Kona’s new Libre platform is billed as “the ultimate adventure machine’ and for once it looks like that hype is justified. Sensibly, Kona have gone for hubs with SRAM’s XD freehub body, allowing a ten-tooth smallest sprocket so the 40-tooth chainring still provides a decent high gear, and it’ll still be reasonable if you decide to fit a 36-tooth ring for hauling gear. There plenty of rack and mudguard mounts, four bottle mounts, a top-tube bag mount and Salsa-style three-bolt rack mounts on the fork legs.” –Road.cc

Check out the full report here.

Kona beanies In stock in USA and Canada web stores now.

With temperatures dropping in the northern hemisphere, and ski fields starting to open, we figured it was our duty to remind you that when you not on your bike, Kona can help you keep your head warm. That’s right, we have a range of beanies (or touques for the maple syrup lovers from up north) in the web store now, if you want to keep that noggin warm, or just look stylish when you’re out and about you’d be doing yourself a disservice not ordering one up! There are three styles and all of them are available in both the Canadian and USA web stores!

For USA and international orders head here.
If you’re in Canada and want to buy one of our dashing touques you can head to our Canadain store here.

 

Kona Dream Builds: David’s FastAF Super Jake

Calgary local David Yexley races CX in the men’s elite category and has just finished his cross season off at the Canadian Cyclocross Championships with a respectable 12th place. During the season he also took home a first in the Alberta Cyclocross Cup, and a second at the Alberta Provincials, he did it all in this custom built fast-AF 2018 Super Jake.

The crew at Bike and Brew in Calgary, never shy away from custom builds. They built David’s race bike around a 2018 Super Jake frame, it’s sporting 55mm deep RX55 wheels, hand built in Canada by Tairin Wheels out of Vancouver. It’s running a Sram Rival drivetrain with Easton EC90 42T carbon cranks to help push them watts out. A setback Thompson Elite was added to get the fit dialed for “full send mode”, the bars are adorned with Supacaz super sticky Kush bar tape with a star fade for added grip and “sexiness”.

David summed it up “This Kona can hold the line when you’re on the edge.”

Limited Edition XL Kona T-shirts Available in Canadian Web Store

Every year we print a couple of exclusive t-shirts for our big USA/Canadian dealer launch. Well, luckily for some of you, the dealers seem to have gotten a little smaller this past year and we have an excess of t-shirts in XL left and we thought we’d offer them up in the Canadian Kona web store. For reference, Elliot, who is pictured below wearing the Authorized DEALER shirt is bang on 6ft tall. And yes that rad graphic is taken from the Kona Rolling Papers artwork.

You can check out this and all our other T-Shirts in our Canadian Web Store here

If you are looking for T-shirts and apparel in the USA you can head here




New Socks and Top Caps in Kona Webstore

We’ve just added three new items to the Kona web store. People were so stoked on the 30th birthday top caps that are shipping on the 2019 bikes that we thought we’d let you add them to any Kona, regardless of model year. Plus we are now offering them in polished silver too for just $5 ($6CAD).

You can get them in the USA store here.
and in the Canadian store here.

And we have just added these two super cool new merino sock designs. Made in the US by Save Our Soles, these socks both feature a 6″ cuff and come in a range of sizes.
The perfect gift for the holiday season? We think so.
You can purchase our new Dynamic and Rasta Skate socks in the USA web store right here.

Kona Dream Builds: The Silver Shadow, George’s Process 153 CR DL 27.5

Don’t you just love Kona builds where you just know the owner has been planning the bike well before it has shown up? Well, George from Turin Bicycles in Denver, Colorado appears to fit into that camp. His very, very shiny and blinging Process 153 CR DL has definitely not been put together with random shop parts or in a hurry. The Push Industries 11-6 shock, Praxis Lyft Carbon cranks, and the custom built wheels are a testament to that. Let’s dive in and check out this Process that’s built for the Front Range!

Kicking things off with the shoes, George has built these wheels around Raceface ARC 31 Carbon 28h rims, they are laced to Onyx mate black hubs with DT Competiton spokes. Both front and rear wheels are shod with 2.6″ Schwalbe Nobby Nic’s.
The drivetrain features a set of 170mm Praxis Lyft carbon cranks with a Wolftooth CAMO spider with SS 28t ring, out back a Shimano XT M8000 derailleur works it magic on an E-thirteen TRS+ 9-46t cassette.

Up front, the 160mm Fox 36 Performance Elite hide a Push Industries ACS3 coil conversion kit.

Stopping is looked after with TRP’s Quadiem G-spec brakes w/Zee metal pads and 203/180mm Shimano RT-86 rotors.

An I9 A35 60mm stem with a 30th birthday Kona stem cap kicks things off in the cockpit. Raceface Atlas 35mm bars and Supacaz Grizips in bling silver keep your digits attached. Wolf Tooths ever popular dropper remote connects up to a 150mm Fox Transfer post as well as the final piece of the puzzle, a well-loved Specialized Elite Power saddle.

Happy Birthday to us.

 

Supercross Cup A Cyclocross Epic

FYI: We are going to focus on Becca’s perspective for this weekends blog post. For reasons that will soon be clear.

Supercross is a race that always has predictably unpredictable (crappy) weather, and no matter the venue or course, something gets thrown in to make it fun and tricky. I had found varying levels of mild success there in the past, and was really hoping that this would be my weekend. It had been 2 years since my previous (and only) UCI win, and I have had countless near misses since. It was time to break the curse.

Cue Supercross weather, and snow dumped across New England on Thursday night and into Friday morning. Were we going to contend with snow, ice, or mud? By the time we raced on Saturday, it was slick mud with icy cold puddles of melted snow. The air temp was in the low 40s but the cold water of snowmelt meant no fingers or toes were safe. 

The course itself is across a grassy field with some undulation and a tricky woods section. But it was all mud. The uphills were runs. Most of the flat sections were runs. The downhills were recovery coasts, but you couldn’t really recover if you were white-knuckling the bars like I was. The woods were less muddy and more soupy, so it was easy to pedal through but you couldn’t see the sharp rocks or the slick roots so you had to choose your speed wisely.

I started well on Saturday, immediately getting slotted behind Canadian U23 National Champ Ruby West. She starts to draw away from me as the lap unfolds, but she bobbles a few times and I get to close the gap. She drops her chain and I get to attack. I am off the front and leading the race.

After 3 laps, I am still leading. I had been riding smoothly, so smoothly in fact, that my 10 minute lap times were all within a second of each other. The crowd is cheering for me that I can finally get my win – it is my race. I feel like my 20 seconds or so is pretty solid, I just have to stay upright.

In the last lap I encounter lapped riders. I yell “RACER BACK” and they don’t yield. One is running in the line I had been riding. The only rideable spot in the wide grassy track. I have to dismount, I yell “JUST STOP”. She does not stop. I go around, losing some time. I continue on. I get to the crest of another hill and see another rider. I yell for her to get out of the line because I am about to go careening down this hill with no option of stopping to avoid running her over. She does not move. I delay my mount. I lose time. She again does not yield around the turn. I run a rideable section. I lose time. The finish is minutes away, and I can now see Ruby over my shoulder. I try to ignore her and stay calm. She catches me up the final hill – a run. We get to the section of boggy grass that had baffled me the whole race – not sure if I should be running or riding and where to mount. She hops on, I keep running and get ground. But then I hop on, she has momentum and passes me. Watching the video is painful because it is so obvious I should have got off to run, but in my head, if I was on the bike when we hit the pavement then I could outsprint her – but the gap was too big and the finish was too close. There was no way to do it. I had lost the race. Again. 

Check out a recap of the race, and the finish (from a million angles) here:

I was pissed, to say the least. Heartbroken. Confused. What made it worse was Ruby was exhausted at the finish, and I wasn’t, but where could I have put that effort out on the course? I had so many emotions that anytime I went to talk to someone I instead wanted to scream and cry. It felt childish to have these feelings but they stem from passion, not hate. Looking back, I am still totally bamboozled as to how it happened. I am happy to note that Ruby shut down the 20 seconds, I didn’t slow down. Any slow down to lost riders was made up in my lap time by working harder once Ruby was over my shoulder. So, luckily, unlike so many times before, I didn’t scratch on the 8-ball. I was happy with the race I had ridden, no crashes, mechanicals or mishaps on the treacherous course. Besides, there was always tomorrow. By the time we were at the podium I was not exactly over it, but in much better spirits and ready to celebrate Ruby’s victory and my own accomplishments. Besides, there was podium bubbly.

Sunday, the course was the same only run in reverse. The temperatures stayed above freezing so the snow continued to melt, but the days’ events churned the water and mud into a thicker concoction. There was even more running, with the flats getting heavier and the downhills becoming uphills. Many races had much thinner fields, the elite races included. Many didn’t bother preriding. I almost didn’t, but for the sake of being a winner I did.

My heart was heavy. My body was cold. I didn’t really feel like racing. We got to the line and I was jealous of the people not showing up. The whistle went and I got on the pedals. I started slower than the day before. Or others started faster? Cassie was throwing elbows like we were in line for the last Tickle Me Elmo. Ruby was at the front. I was not.

I was gapped off through the first run and even more so by a bad line choice down a muddy hill. Her gap increased across an off-camber run. I kept my eyes on the prize: the daylight at the front. I got to the front of the chase, dropped the others easily, and very quickly made time to Ruby just by riding some things she was running. I sat on her wheel for the rest of the lap and into the second just to make sure I was ready to go for it. And I did. I passed Ruby on a run up and never looked back. After the woods section, I heard I had a gap. Through the finish line, they thought Ruby had a mechanical (she later joked to me that she wanted to yell to them, “nope. You’re wrong. I just can’t go harder” haha). I heard I was up to 1:30. 2:30. With a lap to go, I still wanted to take nothing for granted. I joked with all of the onlookers to not jinx it. I only looked over my shoulder once I hit the finish straight. Another flawless day, but this time without the last minute hunt-down. I finally won. Over 4 minutes later, Ruby would cross the line in 2nd.

I am obviously very stoked to have finally won, but it isn’t quite as nice under that lingering pain from Saturday. I wish I could go back in time and decide to run that last corner as Ruby did, so maybe we could come to the pavement together to at least take it to a sprint. Or that she had caught me sooner so we could have battled 1-on-1 a little longer! But what’s done is done, and I have accepted the 2nd and then, of course, that final victory of a top step finish!!!

I only have one more domestic weekend before Nationals, and that is the C1 at NBX in Warwick, RI. Then, the team heads over to Belgium, where each race is a victory just to finish with everything intact!

Check out Kerry’s Vlog:

Kona Dream Builds: Orange is the New Black, Junya’s Process 153 CR DL 29

Recently we showed you Japanese downhill and enduro racer Naoki Idegawa’s stunning 27.5 wheeled Process. Well, today we get to show you his friend and teammate’s bike. Over the weekend Junya Nagata rode his 29″ wheeled Process to second place in the latest round of the Japanese National Enduro Series(his worst result in recent weeks), beating World Enduro number 8 Mark Scott, as well as Loose Dog Lewis and Craig Evans in the process, he was unable to beat 50to01 rider Sam Dale.

At first glance, Junya Nagata’s Process looks to share a pretty similar build to that of his teammates, there is the Fox Shox, Shimano and Mavic love, but it is by no means a carbon copy of  Naoki’s build. Let’s dive in and check it all out in more detail.

Smooth lines. An 11 spd Shimano XTR drivetrain mated to an XT cassette keeps shifting a smooth affair.

Fox’s ever-popular Float X2 rear shock looks after suspension duties out the back…

…While the 170mm Fox 36 Float Factory fork takes care of things up front. The wheels are Mavics Dee Max Pro’s (the ones Sam Hill helped design) and feature an internal width of 28mm and the pair weigh in at a paltry 1895 grams.

Keeping the Shimano theme going with the powerful Saint stoppers.

A Race Face Turbine R 35mm stem holds a Next R35 bar in place and the Chris King headset, K Edge Garmin mount and One Up EDC add just the right amount of flair!

The 125mm Fox Transfer post is topped off with SDG’s legendary Circuit saddle.

What Dream Build Process would be complete without a Marshguard?

Oh almost forgot about the tires. Out back you’ll find a 2.3″ Minion DHR II 3C Maxxterra and up front a DHF 2.5 3C Maxxterra.