Cory Wallace

A Heavy Weekend of Racing for Cory Wallace

Kona Adventure Team Rider and 24 Hour Solo World Champion, Cory Wallace, had a somber start to his racing last weekend. Prior to the Squamish Spakwus 50km race, he received word that one of his close friends had passed away while racing his bike in Nepal. Cory took his grief and poured all of his emotion into a powerful victory in the race. He followed it up with a 120km race in Alberta the next day. Cory is a true machine with a huge heart.

Cory wrote about processing his friend’s passing and channeling it into his racing in his most recent blog post. Our condolences to you, Cory. Thanks for always being a true champion.

Racing in Alberta has its perks

Whiskey Dessert: A Kona Adventure Team Project


Do this after you’ve left home a few hundred times, kids: do something you’ve done many times before, and do it with a big twist. Such was our experience at the 15th Annual Whiskey Off Road. We’d done it collectively around thirty times. We’d been on the podium, we’d been around last place, we’d been somewhere in between, and so the race itself was nothing new. The twist was that we traveled to-and-from the event by mountain bike. Instead of the typical racer’s approach of arriving at the airport, renting a car and zipping to a comfy accommodation, we mapped out a route across 130 miles of urban sprawl into desert scrub into pine-forest mountains. We slept in the dirt. Then we did the race. And then we rode back. Instead of six or eight hours of total ride time during a typical race trip we logged over thirty. Indeed, we made the most of it, and it was remarkable. Here are some moments that stuck. Read more over at Pinkbike.





Cory Wallace’s Double Header

Last weekend Adventure Team Rider Cory Wallace spent his time in British Columbia competing in the Vedder Mountain Classic and the Salty Dog 6 Hour race. With a second place the first day and a new course record the second day it’s safe to say Wallace had a pretty excellent weekend!

Check out the full recap on his blog. 

 

PC: Candace Mihalcheon

Cory Wallace’s High Altitude Training Plan

Kona Endurance and Adventure team rider Cory Wallace is no stranger to super intense training plans. Last year he dabbled with high altitude training as a part of his quest to secure the 24 Hour solo world championship. The hard work paid off and now Wallace is reflecting on lessons learned from training, overtraining, and how altitude plays a big role in his success. Recently, he posted a super in-depth piece on his blog outlining his plans to race over 20 events ranging in duration from 20 minutes to 24 hours. Find out how the world champion builds up enough strength and stamina to withstand the most challenging of races.

Read the full report here.

Cory Wallace’s Nepalese Winter

Kona Adventure Team Rider Cory Wallace knows a thing or two about high altitude training. This past winter, Wallace spent five months pedaling his Kona Hei Hei around the Hymalian mountains and the surrounding cities. His experiences ran the gauntlet from peaceful and extraordinary, to stressful and frustrating, exactly what true adventure should be. Wallace took the time to write up this recap of his trip. Check out some of his tips on where to visit and where to avoid- especially if you’re someone who appreciates sleep.

You can read his full write up here. 

 

Cory Wallace Report: Annapurna 24

Recently, Kona Adventure Team rider Cory Wallace attempted a monster challenge: complete the Annapurna Circuit in under 24 hours and raise $1,000 USD to help build a training center for Nepalese cyclists. This is no minor feat. The Annapurna Circuit is a grueling 215km ride at super high altitude with zero amenities en route. Riding fully self-supported on his Hei Hei DL, Wallace knew the ride would be a challenge, but what he endured was far beyond his imagination. The good news? He made it… in 23:57, just under the wire and managed to double his fundraising goal. It wasn’t without tribulations, though, and Wallace has an intense report up on his website to share with the world. Grab a coffee and give it a good read. It’s an incredible story. Congrats, Cory! We can’t wait to see what you come up with next!

 

Kona Friends! Cory Wallace Needs Your Help!

Super athlete and Kona adventureman, Cory Wallace is aiming for something big and he needs our help. Tomorrow, December 2nd, Cory is planning to ride the Annapurna Circuit and wants to own the record time. In doing so, he’s fundraising to build a new training center for Nepalese mountain bikers. His goal is to raise 1,000 British Pounds (About $1,350 USD or $1,720 CAD). Every cent earned will go towards buying new equipment for the athletes.

As a bonus, Cory is going to give away a boatload of Kona jerseys. He wants everyone to guess how long it will take him to complete the ride from Besi Sahar to Beni which equates to a total of 215km, and 6500m of climbing. Keep in mind this is at MEGA altitude, but Cory is a beast, so we know he’ll crush it. Leave a comment on the fundraising page after you donate a minimum of 10GBP with your best guess on his time. The closest guess will win a Kona team jersey and a Yak Attack Forbidden Kingdom jersey. An additional 20 Yak Attack jerseys will go to the 20 highest donors that leave their contact info.

Go to Cory’s GoFundMe page and donate! Every little bit helps. Let’s help spread the love of mountain biking to every corner of the earth- especially the corner with the most kick ass mountains in the world.

1000 GBP… Let’s blow that goal out of the water!

 

Cory Wallace Defends His Title at the 2017 Yak Attack

Every now and then we hear about events that make us feel so totally mortal. Things like the Tour de France, or an unparalleled athletic feat that has us scratching our heads wondering how on earth people can actually be in such good physical condition. For Kona Adventure/Endurance team rider, Cory Wallace the bigger the suffer the bigger the gain. Wallace is no stranger to mega marathon racing but has just returned from one of the world’s burliest events: the 2017 Yak Attack race, heald around the Annapurna Circuit and into the Forbidden Kingdom of the Upper Mustang in Central Nepal. Over the course of 10 days, riders battle wild weather, extremely high altitude (most the race taking place between 3000 and 5416 meters), and treacherous trails to complete the 9 stage race that traverses nearly 500km. Wallace became the first foreigner to win the event in 2016 and was able to successfully defend his title this year about his Kona Hei Hei CR DL, the perfect weapon for big days in the saddle. For the full, fascinating recap of the race be sure to head over to Wallace’s blog for all of the adventure details.

 

Kona’s Cory Wallace Wins 2017 WEMBO World Solo 24 Hour Mountain Bike Championships

Cory Wallace has been chasing his 24-hour Solo World Championship title for eight years. That’s a decade of preparation, a number of near misses, and an insatiable thirst for the win. Cory’s an endurance specialist among very few in the world, and he knew this one was within his grasp. Here are some quick details from the man himself:

“My first 24 Hour race was the 2008 Solo Champs in Canmore, Alberta. I ate 40 gels that race and had the equivalent caffeine of 70-80 cups of coffee. I finished 5th and was pretty convinced I could win this one day. It took 9 years, 10 more 24 hour Solo Races, and 7 World Championships to eventually reach this goal.  

Jason English has set the bar really high, cutting pit stops down to just seconds and has only lost two 24hr races in the past 8-10 years. Coming into this year’s race I knew my form was better then ever after spending 2 months at altitude in Guatemala. I figured had the cards to win the race but that it would take the right tactics, some good luck and a solid stomach!  

I went through 42 water bottles, and around 8000-9000 calories. In this years race Jason and I stopped for around 5-6 minutes total over the 24 hours.  Most laps we rolled through just grabbing bottles, and there were two stops of about 1 minute each to put on and take off our lighting systems.

Racing all day and through the night to complete 38 laps – and cover 380 km – Cory’s hard work has finally paid off and he can now add Solo 24 Hour Mountain Bike World Champion to his long list of accomplishments. Congrats, Cory. Well deserved.

Cory’s race weapon of choice for these longer events is his Kona Hei Hei DL, kitted out with a Shimano XTR Di2 drivetrain, wheels, and brakes, MRP suspension, and WTB saddle and tires.

Scroll on down for some great photos from 24H di Finale Ligure photographer Francesco Bartoli Avveduti.

Cory Wallace Gunning For the Win at the 2017 World Solo 24 Hour Championships

After his win at the Nimby Fifty in Pemberton, BC last week, Cory Wallace is now over in Europe for the World Solo 24 Hour Championships. Just a hair off the win last year, he’s hungry! Read on below…

Words and photos by Cory Wallace.

The World Solo 24hr Championships are taking place this weekend on a scenic plateau above the Italian Riviera near the border of France.  After coming within 3 minutes of the title last year in New Zealand I’m grateful and excited to be back for another shot this year!  It’s shaping up to be quite the battle with riders from over 30 countries showing up to Italy, including 7 time World Champion Jason English, USA Champ Josh Tostado, a number of Europeans and some dark horses.

My friend Leighton Poidevin will be managing the Pit area with help from Hiran who is here with bags of Radical Lights to make sure the night riding is brighter then the day.  Leighton and I have been racing each other for years at 24 hour races around the World. He’s one of the most accomplished riders to ever come out of  North America and one hell of a friend to volunteer to come over to support this effort.  For this year I’ll be running 2 full suspension Kona Hei Hei’s which should help soften the blows on the rocky and short 8 km course.

Huge thanks to my friends and sponsors who have supported me over the years and have enabled this trip back to the start line at Worlds for another shot at the title.  Kona bikes has always had my back, local bike shops Freewheel Cycle in Jasper, Straight up Cycles in Victoria, and a huge thanks to Hiran at Radical Lights for flying over with the brightest and best lights in the game.

Live results from the race can be found starting at 10 am on Friday Italian time:  which is  2am Friday morning mountain time in North America on the www.tds-live.com website.

Off to work…

The Advantages of Riding at Altitude in Guatemala

To be one of the most accomplished marathon mountain bike racers in the world, you have to put in the work. Kona Endurance and Adventure Team rider Cory Wallace, well, he puts in the work. Year after year. After a good experience last year’s early season training at elevation in Nepal and India, Cory chose to head to Guatemala this spring. Below are a few excerpts, but there are lots of gems in the longer version, which you can go to Cory’s blog to read

Words and photos by Cory Wallace.

Marathon mountain bike racing is similar to being a smart investor as it requires a pile of time invested into training during the off-season to prepare for the payoff later in the season when the big races come around. It can be easy to lose your focus in the middle of winter when the weather is challenging and there’s no real immediate payoff for the hard work, but this is when seasons are made and lost. It’s common to be putting in 25+ hours per week on the bike so it’s nice to have accommodating weather!

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This winter Guatemala was chosen, partly to take part in the El Reto de Quetzal race, partly to study Spanish, and partly to try out an experiment and to see how training at altitude would payoff. Having good success riding at altitude in India and Nepal last fall and the amazing feeling of having 3 lungs after returning to lower altitudes it gave me the inspiration to explore this avenue a little further.

Doing a bit of research and with past experiences I’ve come to my own conclusions about what should work and it seems living and training at altitudes between 2200 m and 2600 m seems ideal. Anything lower and the concentration of oxygen in the air is still high enough that it may limit adaptations, while any higher and there is not enough oxygen to be able to push yourself hard enoughto keep your muscles strong.

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The idea is that the body will increase the volume of oxygen-carrying red blood cells, become more efficient at using oxygen, and due to the lack of oxygen both the lungs and heart will have to work at an elevated intensity. It also seems to be important to break up the altitude training with retreats to lower elevations to help with recovery to put in some strong efforts in oxygen-rich air, and once you return to altitude the body re-kickstarts the adaptations. Time will tell but things are on track right now with the body showing nice improvements every week.

Check out a few more photos below, and read the full story on Cory’s blog

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Kona Adventure Team: Double Century Sandwich

The Kona Adventure Team is an extension of the Kona Endurance Race team in 2017. We aim to expand the repertoire of our endurance athletes, embarking on adventures that inspire, both us personally and hopefully you as well. Our athletes all love the bike, and these trips are our attempt to show a shared passion not only for riding, but also for living a full and meaningful existence. 

For the first Adventure Team story, Cory, Kris, Spencer,and Barry took on a double century on the California Coast, sandwiching a race in the middle.

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Words by Barry Wicks. Photos by Patrick Means.

The plan was simple. We’d ride from Pacifica, CA to Healdsburg, CA on Friday. On Saturday, we’d race the Grasshopper Adventure Series race called Old Caz. On Sunday we would ride back to our starting point.
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At what point does a course of travel become an adventure? What makes it turn into something else, like a journey? Are there clear metrics that make it so, or is it just a matter of perspective? Whatever the case, the Kona Adventure Team had around 17 hours and 330 miles of bike riding ahead of us – plenty of time for engaging in some trifling handlebar philosophy.
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107 miles. That’s how far we had to go one day one. That didn’t seem that far to a seasoned squad of professional bike athletes, but as the hours ticked on, and the destination remained distant, the remaining hours of daylight became a concern. The selected route, while heavy on dirt – and climbing and views in the first half – gave way to silky pavement in the last 40 miles.
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Here we are, there’s were we are going. Distance and time compress and expand in rhythm with our bodies’ need for food, water, or for the climb to come to an end.
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At times, pulling off in a muddy gravel lot to stare at the water and share a king size bag of peanut butter M&Ms is the entirety of one’s world.
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Then you find a strong Canadian to drag you those final miles into the arms of a waiting burrito, cold beer and camaraderie.
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The Grasshopper Adventure series is a longstanding race event, with its foundations firmly in the grassroots camp of “lets all get together, do an awesome ride, and try to smash each other to bits.” In this, its 19th year of existence, it has grown from the rag tag group of about 50 riders to a swollen 450+ hearty souls up for the challenge.
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The gathering and swapping of tales at the finish line is the ritual by which the ride legend grows. This gathering of the athletes, watching their fellow riders struggle to the line, is the birth of the legend that each and every Grasshopper race has created.
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By the book, an adventure is “playing a game of chance.” As a term, it is rooted in the unknown and a risk of loss. On an adventure, there ought to be a tension between something that is about to happen and whether you’ll arrive at the other side.
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The return journey always seems easier, but at the same time bittersweet. The destination is known, it means the end of the journey is near, and the escape is coming to a close.
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For us, the essential element is the experience of the place and the time spent together. Up and down the coasts, across long valleys, through the woods and over the mountains. We carve out our own version of finding happiness and bring that to the banquet to share.
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In the end, we are left with tired legs, dirty bikes, large smiles and the memories we created together.kona_norcal2-85

Wherever your next adventure may take you, we hope you find all the things that you are searching for.
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