Enduro

Lucy Schick Reports From Harper Mountain

Kona grassroots rider Lucy Schick and her Process 153 CR DL had a solid weekend at the Canadian National Enduro Series race at Harper Mountain, including a stage victory by over 30 seconds. Way to go Lucy!

“This past weekend was the second Canadian National Enduro Series race at Harper Mountain in Kamloops and it was definitely the most fun I have ever had at a bike race. I crashed on stage one and sprained my finger but finished the race strong and even managed to win the gnarliest stage by 30 seconds. I placed 3rd in U21 and was super happy with my race other than the crash. The trails were amazing because you got a bit of everything. Some stages were technical and some were super fast. Stage 4 was grass slalom down the ski hill and it was a riot. My bike was dialled and felt super smooth on the steep dusty rocks. Really looking forward to the next CNES race in Panorama but first I’m racing the Gryphon this weekend!”

All photos by Jackson Parker of Clear Glass Media (@clear.glass.media)

Kona GDuro Team Reports From E1 Series In Winterberg, Germany

Kona GDuro team rider Stefan Westerveld reports from Winterberg.

This year the first stop of the German-based Enduro One series was combined with the Dirt Masters Festival in Winterberg with the huge turnout of nearly 700 racers! This event might have been the biggest enduro race ever held on German ground.
The event area next to the Trailpark on the other side of the festival area was chosen to help maintain crowds with the ten thousands of visitors and also brought more spectators to the stages nearby. A huge crowd of cheering fans on Stage 8 gave an extra push of motivation to the riders. On Stage 1 , the “Black Line” of the Bikepark Area which might have been the most difficult stage technically, gave riders some challenge. Unfortunately, I gave a tree on one of the off-camber bits a little hug and lost a few seconds.


Stage 2 was a new trail in one of the small forests beside the trailpark. The fresh, loamy surface is by far our favorite style of trail riding. And even with the first pedaling section at the top, I had so much fun letting my new Process 29” go. To my surprise, this resulted in the best stage time in my class on that day.
All other stages were more or less part of the Winterberg Trailpark with less technical requirements of the rider. The missing track signage on some parts may be the only point of criticism of the weekend.
All in all, this was a super fun event. The combination with the DIRT Masters paid off. Thunderstorms came in on midday and the event organization had to cancel the race for the last riders while all top riders had already finished. With massive hail showers, it was the right decision. Back on flats with the new Process 29” I’m super happy! First race, first top ten, first podium!

Our dream build of the Process 29er AL is on the way!
Le’st see what this bike is capable of on the next stop in Roßbach.

Cory Wallace’s Double Header

Last weekend Adventure Team Rider Cory Wallace spent his time in British Columbia competing in the Vedder Mountain Classic and the Salty Dog 6 Hour race. With a second place the first day and a new course record the second day it’s safe to say Wallace had a pretty excellent weekend!

Check out the full recap on his blog. 

 

PC: Candace Mihalcheon

Kona Gduro Team

The Kona Gduro team was founded in 2010 by Matthias Haake as the Pedaliero Team, the counterpart of the famous German Pedaliero print magazine, best known for their special issues like the XXL Eurobike edition and spot guides. This year, our fifth year with Kona we’ve renamed our team to KonaGduroTeam. Along with fellow racer Stefan Westerveld the team has more than 30 years of race experience and knowledge.


Matthias has raced in all of the big downhill series from the early nineties on with support from the big brands like SRAM, SCHWALBE, BLISS, ERGON and many more since. Stefan has a long BMX race, street and freestyle background. In the mid-2000’s he shifted focus to mountain bike freeride and racing. Talking about racing, the spirit being on the bike in nature, chasing trails and riding with friends is essential for us, whether it is against the clock or just on an after work trail ride.

 

All of this makes us so stoked to be a part of the Kona family. People here are awesome and fully committed to every facet of bicycling. Thanks for sharing the ride!

Meet us in the race pits or on the trail, give us a hug and have a drink.

Our schedule for the race season:

Trailtrophy Series
Enduro One Series
Selected EWS stop
Enduro2
Endurocup.be
Megavalanche
Press launches and other media events
More trails, more reviews, more fun! 🙂

You can find out more at https://konagduroteam.wordpress.com/.

 

Spencer Paxson Wins Inaugural XC-Enduro Combined at the Vedder MTB Festival

 

‘Enduro! It has what XC racers crave!’ my buddies and I joked as we rolled in to Day 2 of our “Vedder Doubleheader” weekend up in the Fraser Valley. The Idiocracy reference was a double entendre of sorts; the easy, no-pressure climbing and ripping downhill in enduro, along with questioning our own sensibility for racing two hard days in a row.

Why two days in a row? The true prize of the weekend, for me at least, was the newly minted King/Queen of the Mountain Trophy devised by the organizers of the Vedder Mountain Classic. It would go to the man and woman with the fastest combined time in the XC and enduro. Day 1 was the Vedder Mountain Classic, a 30km marathon-format cross country race. Day 2 was the opening round of the Canadian National Enduro Series. Combined, the days would tally around 11,000 feet of vert up and down. Imagine some of the best dirt conditions you’ve ever had (and that is not hyperbole!), and any sensible MTB-er would have taken up the challenge.

 

Well…I’m not sure if sensible is the correct word, but how about eager? You could say that Saturday’s XC was an aggressive practice day. The course was challenging, but the immaculate conditions took the edge off of the effort. Teammate Cory Wallace and I battled out on the start loop and up the first huge climb to the top of The Den with Canadian cyclocross National Champ Micheal Van Den Ham in the mix. My Hei Hei (size Large) equipped with MRP Ribbon fork and WTB Trail Boss tires was feeling spry, and I sneaked around Mr. Wallace on the long descent back down to the lake, beginning lap two with a comfortable gap, and pressing on up the second half of the race to take the win. Cory rolled in 2nd, we traded some high fives, went to the beer garden, jumped in the lake, and even collected some Canadian cash. Day 1 done!

Phillip Jones

Sunday’s enduro is captured well-enough in the images. It was a ripping good time! I raced three out of five stages blind (good prep for TransCascadia coming up later this summer) and executed a quick-but-conservative day to get through cleanly. My result on Sunday was lackluster compared to Saturday’s XC, but it was good enough to claim the first-ever Vedder KOM Trophy! Truth be told, there weren’t many who went for the double header, so it had a bit of a tree-fell-in-the-woods level of accomplishment, but given the caliber of this event, I’m hopeful to see this “omnium” format more hotly contested in the future. It has to start somewhere! So with that, the weekend was wrapped up, and it was time to get back home to finish celebrating Mother’s Day.

James Lissimore

As I said of last year’s experience racing the Vedder Mountain Classic, there is no pretense to riding or racing mountain bikes in this part of the world, no matter your skill level, because in BC, mountain biking and racing just is. It’s a f*@#% good time!

Vallelujah Enduro Race Report – Ben Clayton, Get’s Philosophical About Enduro Racing!

UK Grassroots rider Ben Clayton tackled the Vallelujah Enduro recently. He finished a respectable 27 out of 150 riders his first race back after a broken wrist. Check out the full race report below.
First race weekend in 8 months!!!

Snow and a deluge of rain and mud led to the first two races of 2017 getting canceled. Bummer when you’re trying to get some race miles into your legs after breaking your wrist trying to conquer The Lakes. Peebles is like Mecca for us UK mtb folk, but with the beast from the east and other biblical conditions, it’s been a struggle to get good mtb time in. Road miles and the dark temptress of Zwift have been the only forms of training that have been a constant. The Kona Process 153 CR has had few dirty rides out, mainly whiteout insta vid sessions. When I got to Peebles in the sunshine I had a game plan, I’m not going into details, as everyone who knows me, knows why my usual attitude to riding was somewhat tamed down. I went to Peebles with an “enjoy the ride don’t get hurt” attitude. Somewhat different to my usual XXXX it, “let’s have it” approach to racing. Practice was everything I wanted…music, good times, the best UK trails (in my opinion) and a solid set of lads in the starting line up. Practice was fun. Fun and speed don’t always go hand in hand and that was to be true in race runs. I had the proverbial monkey on my back that’s for sure! I really need to establish the whole “race have fun ethos”. But at the end of the day, we all had a blast and results are results. One big crash on stage 3 put me well out of the running but the rest of the stages were clean but very reserved. I ended up 27th out of over 150 riders in a very stacked field with some top boys going well on home turf. It’s now on to some serious training and lots of mountain bike time before we fly out to France for round 3 of the Enduro World Series. Can’t wait to get back with the EWS circus. The fans at these races are really what makes these events so good, so I’m looking forward to putting on a show for them and hopefully getting a solid result.

THE DIRTY SANCHEZ (TDS) RACE REPORT

Ali stopping for a mid-run beer with encouragement from Mark and Heather.

The Dirty Sanchez: the gnarliest enduro out there. Broken & bruised limbs, mid-run whiskey shots, hundreds of hecklers, the rowdiest bike trails… sums up to my idea of an epic weekend. The Kona crew made an appearance in full force with Ali Osgood, Becky Gardner, Hannah Bergemann, Ryan Gardner, and Scott Countryman, and put together a race report from the weekend.

Becky, Ali, and Hannah on day 1

Hannah B. – Through an Instagram contest submission I was granted a “golden ticket” to race in the 2018 TDS enduro. A month later I was flying with my bike down from Bellingham to Northern California, not quite sure what I was getting myself into.

 

Perry, Chelsea, & Hannah; the 3 Golden Ticket contest winners

Friday was practice day which involved riding as many of the trails as possible, with shuttles to the top after every lap. This meant riding until my arms felt like they might not work anymore.

Dropping into the steep rock garden section of stage 3

Saturday was race day 1, and started off with 3 of the gnarliest trails. My goal for the weekend was to keep it upright and I was (barely) able to make that goal! Stage 6 brought us through the infamous and gnarliest stage, Vigilante, which runs through a steep, dried up creek bed of loose rocks. Hundreds of Hecklers lined the gully, hollering as all the racers wobbled and tumbled their way down the trail.

Trying to stay high on the wall rides among the hecklers

Sunday was day 2, and we endured another 6 stages of gap jumps, loose rocks, and off camber steeps. I finished each stage completely gassed but with a huge, cheesy grin on my face.

The whole weekend was amazing. I landed in 7th in a large field of ladies and was happy to have relatively clean race runs. The Sanchez family and friends are one incredible crew of people, and I’m so grateful they let me come experience all the glory of the TDS.

Until next time!

Hannah B.

 

Ali Osgood:

When I rolled up to the Sanchez Compound for my second TDS I had 2 goals. The first was to not repeat my first year at the event by getting injured in practice, and my second goal was to be the first woman to win the Spirit Leader Award.

Ali getting steezy on a step-up

(side note: The Spirit Award goes to the racer who meets the spirit criteria of TDS legends like Mark Weir and Ariel Lindsley. That racer must improve the experience of all TDS goers, be it on the race course, during pastimes, or, especially, round the campfire into the late hours of the night. Every year in contention for the coveted award voices are lost, beers are chugged, trails are slayed, and many laughs are shared.)

I picked up Hannah Bergemann from the airport thursday night, we settled into our camp, and woke up to a chilly Friday morning of practice. As always, the trails didn’t disappoint. Imagine a trail system that somehow manages to feature unparalleled flow with gap jumps, massive wall rides, and deep berms, steep rocky gnar, spongy fragrant loam, rooty chutes, and high speed tech. That’s what makes up the 13 stages of TDS. But the mtb wonderland got the better of me and by my fifth run in practice I managed to scorpion over my bars and punch a rock, rendering my pinky both broken and dislocated (I would discover days later after finally getting an x-ray).

The result of Ali’s crash during practice.

So I managed to fail my first goal, but the trail side doctors seemed confident I could still ride with the proper ratio of booze to ibuprofen and a firm buddy tape system. With my grip and general bike control being more compromised than I anticipated, I found myself crashing in the first few stages on Saturday. So I reorganized my goals and decided I didn’t care how slow I had to go, that I would still finish the race smiling.

Yep.. a pantsless run was in the cards on day 2. There’s a reason Ali earned the spirit award

After that, my weekend took a hard left turn from a bike race to a beer chugging, bar humping, break dance fighting shit show that I somehow survived with minimal bodily harm (besides an array of bruises and a pissed of left pinky). I made a lot of new friends, improved my beer bong skills, rode with some of the raddest pro women on the West Coast, and learned how to stay positive when things don’t go my way.

Getting the spirit award takes commitment…

While I failed to walk away from TDS uninjured, I somehow found myself accepting an impressive spread of prizes after winning the spirit award. I’v had some good wins in my race career, but this one takes the cake. After navigating the wild waters of TDS weekend, I finally understand what it’s all about and I am grateful to be apart of it.

So what’s it all about anyway? Come out next year, and you’ll find out…

Ryan Gardner:

Becky and I have attended the TDS enduro for several years now and have had the pleasure of watching it evolve from a couple guys in the woods to an elite enduro with hundreds of racers. Every year we head to Grass Valley eager to race on some of Northern California’s best terrain. I made the trip over the mountain from Oakland and was stoked to see what my new Kona Process 153 could do.

 

Ryan keeping it pinned through the hecklers

After ripping practice laps and remembering just how awesome the tracks are, I was ready to send it into day one of racing. Unfortunately, the first day of racing was not in my favor. After a crash in the rock garden, a flat tire, and a few more less-than-ideal runs, I didn’t find myself where I’d have liked after day 1.

Vigilante took more than a few people down, unknown rider.

Thankfully, the best part of racing TDS is not just the riding, but the festivities and like-minded people that make the Dirty Sanchez. After some bike repairs, having a few Hey Buddy beers, I was ready for more races, and day two brought a way better day. With clean runs and no mechanicals, I was able to put some top ten runs together against a stacked class of riders.

Becky Gardner:

After finishing up another winter in Telluride, Co, I made the trek over to TDS. After a winter of skiing, and recently recovering from a broken rib, my game plan was to ride consistent, smooth, and in control, especially after a history of injuries at the race. The first day of practice at TDS is always interesting coming from southern Colorado where the only trails available to ride all winter are more fitness-oriented and the rocky, gnarly trails lay beneath the snow.

 

Becky looking stoked after a day of practice.

By the end of the practice day and practicing all the features, I was feeling good going into race day. The weekends sunshine brought perfect dirt and tacky berms. Feeling super confident on more pedally stages, it took a bit to warm up to the more technical stages, but by the end of day 1, I was feeling strong on my Process 134.

Becky tackling the nasty rocks of Vigilante

All 12 stages went well, except for a few mishaps on some of the earlier stages, but the whole race was mechanical free and I was stoked to sit inside the top 10 against some very strong riders.

-Becky

PB and J: The Kona Global Enduro Team battle trying conditions at Colombian EWS

Alexander Kangas, Manizales, Colombia Enduro World Series #2. Photo: Sven Martin

2017’s EWS season has affectionately garnered the nickname Enduro Wet Series (less affectionately by those actually racing) and after the first bone-dry opening round last week some thought that, just maybe, we might be in for a dry season of racing. Who were they kidding?

Alexander Kangas, Manizales, Colombia Enduro World Series #2. Photo: Sven Martin

By the time everyone’s bikes eventually showed up in Manizales, Colombia, the skies had opened and what looked to be some of the best dry loam imaginable had turned into mud with the texture of peanut butter and jelly. Steering was non-existent. Kona Global Team rider Alexander Kangas likened the feeling to riding on ice, without spikes!

It wasn’t all mud at the second stop on the 2018 EWS series, though. For the first time since 2013, the race kicked off with a short urban prologue through downtown Manizales. Scott Countryman surprised himself in his first ever urban race cruising to a respectable 38th place in the short punchy and physical stage. Kangas suffered a mechanical and finished the stage a bit off the pace but given its short nature, it would not have a massive effect on the following day’s results.

Race day saw the seven stages turning to six as a heavy overnight downpour had turned the already extremely slippery and carnage-inducing stage six into an even more uncontrollable beast. The desert-dwelling Countryman wanted to pull the pin at times during the day but pushed through for 76th on the day. “After raining all night, race day became a survival day for me. I cyclocrossed the top half of the second stage (first of the day) and was feeling pretty good until I got too wild in a chute and sent myself head first into a tree and broke my saddle. One stage down and I was ready to pull out of the race, but I taped my saddle back onto my bike and continued. Stage three went fairly well besides having to pass several racers that had missed their start times and were thrown into the mix right in front of me. I found some flow and was starting to feel good about the rest of the day. My hopes were dashed again on the next stage when coarse tape laying in the trail got wrapped up in my cassette and brake. I wasn’t able to pedal and had to strider my way down half of the stage. Again, I was ready to give up but I forced myself to continue. I had no more motivation at that point and got myself down the rest of the stages safely. In the end, I am very happy I can say I finished and it is an experience I am sure I will look back on fondly.”

Scott Countryman, Manizales, Colombia Enduro World Series #2. Photo: Sven Martin

Kangas, who thought round one in Chile was the last time he’d see anti-grip was, like many riders, ultimately bettered by the lack of traction in Manizales. “The Colombian soil and weather conditions were far from optimal for me. Overall it was an OK race. I struggled on the first three stages, and rode OK on four and five. Things would have been fine if it wasn’t for me losing my top jockey wheel at the start. Stages seven and eight were nothing to write home about! 58th overall is nowhere near where I want to be, but considering I’ve only had 10 days riding on the new bike since November, I’ll take the positives with me and go back home with a good feeling for the upcoming races.”

Alexander Kangas, Manizales, Colombia Enduro World Series #2. Photo: Sven Martin

Scott Countryman, Manizales, Colombia Enduro World Series #2. Photo: Sven Martin

Ryan Gardner reports from Mexico’s Trans Puerto Vallarta

With the major portion of the enduro race season still a few months away but a month or two of training already on the books, Becky and I decided to head south for a few days and check out the Trans Puerto Vallarta. The Trans PV was new this year and included some awesome trails we had already ridden in the little mountain town of Mascota Mexico. We were also treated to some new trails in San Sabastian and mountains surrounding Puerta Vallarta. The whole race took four days with travel to Mascota and included 15 special stages. It was the perfect opportunity to test new bikes, dial in suspension, and shake off the cobwebs from a few months away from racing. Plus, it’s hard to say no to warm temps, tacos, and those chill Mexican vibes.

After flying into PV we built up bikes including my brand new Process 153 29”. I only had one day on this monster before I crammed its big wheels into my Evoc bag, but I had already set a few PR’s on my home trails. This bike breathes fire.

 

After a bike building session, 5-6 tacos, and a margarita (It’s ok to go full gringo) we were off to bed and excited to travel to San Sabastian the next day.

 

The trails of San Sabastian (and neighboring Mascota) are old. Really old. Most of the trails we raced are leftover mining trails and roads from the 1700’s. Even the estate where we camped for the first two nights was built sometime around 1750 and was the center of gold and other mineral mining for the surrounding areas. From here, mules carried the valuable metals down to the Puerto Vallarta so they could be exported. From these ancient paths, the riders of Mexico have reclaimed (sometimes very) narrow single tracks. This, coupled with the dry season, made for some exiting blind racing as riders struggled to find speed, traction, and flow throughout the day. Ryan had a solid day placing second behind good friend and training partner Cory Sullivan by just one second, and ahead of the rest of the field by over 30 seconds. Becky crushed the first four stages before taking a big crash, splitting her knee open, and taking a stem to the sternum. Even with the crash, she finished the day in first place.

Once back to camp, riders were treated to cervecas and a mountain of carnitas. This particular combination results in near instantaneous sleep. Not even the snoring of racers and barking of extremely photogenic Mexican dogs could keep us awake.

Day two of racing saw us move to the steep and fast trails of Mascota. The tracks here are varied and include some wide open sections, some incredibly tight switchbacks, and some pretty gnarly rock gardens. It was in the latter that I made a critical error. My Process 153 had been egging me on all day, seemingly frustrated by my pace. The whole bike comes alive at speed and it’s a constant battle to keep things under control on a trail you have never ridden. I got just a little too excited in one gnarly rock garden and instead of rolling a 4ft boulder, I pulled up and hucked out towards a side hill hoping to keep some speed. Unfortunately, I landed juuuuust a bit to the right and clipped a knife-edged rock which put a 2.5-inch slice in my tough casing WTB vigilante. It was an immediate flat for me and a 30-minute time loss as I finagled a fix to get me back to town. After some Mexican ingenuity and the incredible durability of my Vigilante, I was able to get it patched up and win 3 of the 4 remaining stages including a super tight trail on which my “dinosaur bike” was supposed to be slow.

 

Becky, denouncing stitches which would have taken her out of the race, soldiered on to the amazement of everyone in the field. Rocking last season’s Process 134 and fueled by ice cream stops and adorable Mexican puppies, she rallied through the day only losing one spot on the timesheet by day’s end.


That night we set up camp at a beautiful ranch outside Mascota. There was only one cold shower, but the home-cooked food and late night pizza delivery made up for it. Talking that evening with friend and event promoter Alvaro Gutierrez Leal, he confided that the next morning’s transfer to the stages was what he was most worried about. It was a three-hour drive through 4×4 roads, in two-wheel drive Toyota vans. Turns out he was right. After a few sketchy river crossings and putting some serious wear on the clutch plate, we arrived in the coastal mountains above Puerto Vallarta.
Where the first two days were loose, these trails were on another level of negative traction. No front breaking here. Every stage of the day was wide open with almost no traction, some sand, and scary off-camber corners. We were also given some “Mexican surprises,” like a trail that enters a backyard, loops around a house, and then exits through the front gate. A flock of chickens presented a few opportunities for nose-bawks.

After finishing on a steep and sandy track known as El Scorpion we gathered together for a chill ride back to the ocean, buckets of beers, more tacos, and a bit of Raicilla (the traditional liquor Mascota made from wild agave and brewed in backyard stills). Due to the tire fiasco, Ryan finished off the podium. Becky finished the race in second place, injury and all!

 

 

Photos by Nico Switalski

Words by Ryan Gardner

 

 

Announcing the 2018 Kona Roster!

AGGY, FEARON, VERNER, WALLACE, WERNER HEADLINE KONA'S 2018 ROSTER

Spring is just around the corner, and that can only mean one thing: bike season is near! We’re excited to kick things off by announcing our 2018 roster, which is chock full of speed, talent, and creativity, ensuring an exciting and memorable season.

KONA GRAVITY TEAM 2018

On the gravity side Connor Fearon will be flying the Kona colors at the 2018 downhill World Cup races, set to kick off in Croatia in April. Connor will be running the Operator as he attempts to climb atop the podium throughout the season’s seven races. Also returning is legendary Kona athlete
Graham Agassiz. Whoever said, “freeride is dead,” clearly never rubbed elbows with Aggy and friends. Aggy’s goals for 2018 are to continue to push the limits of what’s possible on a bike, ride as many wild lines as possible, and create some interesting content.

The gravity team is rounded out by North Shore standout Caleb Holonko, and downhillers
Josh Button of Australia, and Anthony Poulson from Quebec.

KONA GLOBAL ENDURO TEAM 2018

New for 2018 is the Kona Global Enduro Team. The Global Enduro Team will compete in races throughout the world, including the EWS. Squamish ripper Rhys Verner, who saw strong results in 2017 will be leading the EWS charge alongside Ireland’s multi-national champion Leah Maunsell. Verner and Maunsell are joined by Swede Alexander Kangas and Americans Ryan Gardner and Scott Countryman.

KONA ENDURANCE TEAM 2018

Keeping the spirit of fun alive is the major goal of Kona’s Endurance and Adventure Team. Personality and talent run deep with this crew, and a good time is never far away. With 24 Hour Solo World Champion Cory Wallace in the mix, big races, and bigger challenges are sure to unfold. Finishing in 3rd place at US cyclocross nationals, Kerry Werner is back and ready to challenge for the top step of the podium. Americans Barry Wicks and Spencer Paxson are always up for whatever shenanigans they can concoct on their bikes and will be joined on big adventure days by Sechelt’s Kris Sneddon.

The 2018 Kona team covers a massive spectrum of riding talent and abilities and we’re looking forward to seeing what’s in store! Be sure to check out our team page on Konaworld.com for more info on each rider, and tune into the Cog throughout the season for updates on race results, expeditions, and adventure logs.

Kona Process 153 CR DL Named a Bike Mag Bible Top Pick!

Bike Magazine has released their 2018 Bible of Bike Tests, one of the most comprehensive mountain bike tests in the world, and has named the Kona Process 153 CR DL as a top choice. Gear Editor and tester Travis Engel makes it no secret that he’s a lover of 29ers in his normal routine, so his selection of the Process for his top pick makes it an awesome surprise.

Writer and tester Jonathan Weber had this to say about the tester’s overall impression of the Process CR DL: “Our testers were enamored with this bike. One’s first impression was of a very neutral, balanced-feeling all-mountain bike. Another remarked that it felt like a downhill bike, and really came alive when the trail turned steeply, chunkily downward. All three were impressed by its climbing characteristics. Another highlighted how fun the Process is, even on less-technical or slower sections of trail.

 

Check out the full review of the Process CR DL here!

Getting to Know the Process G2

When we launched the revamped Process line back in late summer, Pinkbike spent a ton of time dissecting the new features of the bike. Check out their in-depth dive here. Writer Mike Levy’s a big fan of 29ers and he was partial to the AL/DL 29er, because of wheel size and cost. “The 153 AL/DL 29’s big wheels go over and through everything and, since my riding style seems to suit 29” wheels lately, I’d happily reach for the heavier bike with the cost-conscious build,” he wrote.

What’s your Process of choice?