Kona Process

Pinkbike.com review the 2016 Process 134DL “Kona have packaged up a slice of the Pacific Northwest’s riding style for the rest of the world to experience and enjoy”

Rachelle Frazer from Pinkbike.com has been riding a 2016 Process 134 DL for the last few months now and her in-depth review is online now and its a pretty darn through write up that leaves few questions unanswered. You can click here to read the the full report.

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“Kona have packaged up a slice of the Pacific Northwest’s riding style for the rest of the world to experience and enjoy in the 134 DL. It’s no featherweight, but the DL climbs well enough that you could go and race your local enduro on it. More importantly, you will be getting the most of descending while having a lot of fun. If we’re honest with ourselves, many of us don’t need 160mm+ of suspension for our local trails but if you still want to get a little sendy, the 134 DL has a bulletproof frame, a lifetime warranty, is ready, obliging and will cost you less than a beat up Subaru.”Rachelle Frazer

Leah Maunsell reports from Round 3 of the Enduro World Series in Carrick, Ireland

Taking the win here in the U21 women last year had its pressures, with all of our crazy Irish fans expecting a repeat result again this year. On the other hand, I had so much support this weekend with people cheering me on all the way up every transition and down every stage.2016-Ireland-Race-2920

Not long after sprinting off the line of Stage 1 I had a mechanical. I wasn’t able to fix it mid stage so I had to ride the whole of stage one chainless. I pumped everywhere I could and rode smooth. I had to run the end of the stage because of the uphill. It wasn’t an ideal start being 37 seconds behind but I knew I still had six long stages to fight for some time back.

I had an over the bars at the start of Stage 2 but I still managed to get back 3 seconds.

Heading up to Stage 5 after lunch I was 23 seconds off the lead. I attacked Stage 5 hard and got back 20 seconds leaving me with a time fast enough for top 6 in Elite Women.2016-Ireland-Race-2923

Coming into the field at the finish was nerve–racking sitting in the hot seat and watching the times appear on the board one by one! I was stoked to find out I had taken the win in U21 Women by 11 seconds! ‘

Jonathan punctured on stage 2 like so many others in the sharps rocks, he keep it going sending everything all day for the massive home crowds, but incurring a lot of time penalties after running late for two stages he was out of the running!

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Kona Super Grassroots riders report from Round 1 of the 2016 EWS in Chile

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

Ryan Gardner during practice on Day 1 of 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile. Photo Sven Martin

Kona Super Grassroots enduro riders Ryan Gardner and James Rennie made the decision this year to take their Process 153’s and tackle a bunch of EWS rounds, both riders figured that kicking things off with Round 1 in Chilé, South America was as good a place to start as anywhere. Over the four epic days, between practice and racing, Ryan and James rode over 120 miles and climbed over 20,000 feet. Both coming from full time work at their respective homes, the two posted some solid results over the weekend. James’ first stage result of 32nd being one of them and Ryan’s consistency, which placed him in the top 50 (surround by full-time sponsored professionals) being his. Unfortunately for James, a very similar top 50 result was thwarted as he snapped his chain powering out of the very flat stage six start. Both Ryan and James have fired through their race reports, read on to hear about round one of the Enduro World Series went from their perspectives.

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

James Rennie embracing the Spirit of Enduro on the first day of practice, because of the physical nature of the courses only one practice run was possible, creating any incredibly level field of riders where everyone was essentially racing blind. Photo Sven Martin

Round 1 of the Enduro World Series in Corral, Chile is in the books and it was everything that makes Enduro great. Huge days on the bike, far off places, friendly people, and rugged downhills all combined to make an awesome kickoff to the season. With Corral being well off the beaten path for most EWS racers, everyone came into the race with zero knowledge of the courses. Almost everyone’s first glimpse of the stages was during practice on Thursday and Friday and with the distance between each stage, only one practice run was possible. This made for nearly blind racing on tracks that never looked overly difficult, but made for some very tricky racing. Most of the courses started with tough corners and lots of pedaling before dropping into more technical descents. The super steep and physically demanding switchbacks on stages two and five claimed handfuls of riders both during practice and the race as fatigue began to set in. World class riders, even those known for their fitness, began to show visible signs of wear as the week wore on. However, the absolutely stunning backdrop of coastal Chile, and a backpack full of empinadas made the grinding climbs a little easier to power through.

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

James Rennie en route to a 32nd place finish in Stage 1 , during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile. Photo Sven Martin

After a winter of racing cyclocross and doing big rides around California, I was hoping to meet the first round with a full head of steam and all the fitness I could ask for. Instead I was forced to meet the 120 miles and 20k feet of climbing over four days with a pretty solid cold that never quite let me feel like myself. With that in mind I told myself that I needed to just get through the weekend and not worry too much about placing. However, as any racer knows, it’s easy to get a little over excited and I pushed myself way too hard on stage one. I finally blew my hands off the bars in a hard g-out and took a digger. I got up as fast as I could and sprinted hard to make up time, only to blow out the very next corner in the loose dirt and dust. I finished off the stage and decided that it was probably better to dial it back a bit and be consistent and I managed to stay off the ground for the rest of the weekend. There were a few injuries including a compound fractured ankle that really highlighted the risks involved with riding as close to the line as you can on demanding trails with minimal practice. Enduro is continuing to come into its own and the consistent speed and concentration required to be a top international rider is truly impressive.

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

Ryan Gardner trying not to get distracted by the insane views of coastal Chilé, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile. Photo Sven Martin

The whole race experience was a blast as it was visibly clear how excited the people of Corral were to be hosting an international group of racers. Each transfer stage was made a little easier by the throngs of locals smiling and waving as we passed and the Spanish cheers echoing from along the steepest parts of the descent. It was also nice to share the climbs and recap the previous stages with new super grassroots racer James Rennie who was having a killer weekend (placing near the top 30 on stage one!) before getting unlucky on the last stage with a broken chain. I am personally super happy to have made the top 50 riders and place 5th fastest American. Not too bad for an office jockey with a cold! Next up is a day or two of rest and then on to Argentina this weekend for Round 2. – Ryan Gardner

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

Vancouver based Kiwi, James Rennie, recovering after the first days racing at the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile. Photo Sven Martin

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

James Rennie, Foot Out, Flat Out. Photo Sven Martin

After two long days of practice I was already feeling weary coming in to the first day of racing. The trails in Corral proved to have a good mix of everything, great dirt and high speeds seemed to be the main theme though. Day one went well for me, finishing the day in 60th after losing a whole of time on stage two. I was stoked with my first stage time though, where I finished in 32nd.

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

James Rennie Scandi flick though a Chilean switchback, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile. Photo Sven Martin

Day two the weather was cooler making the climbs a bit more manageable. My legs felt great and stages four and five went well with both finishes around the top 50. After a longer wait at the top of the final stage my legs felt fresh, so fresh that I snapped my chain out of the gate and couldn’t get along the first flat section of the stage losing a whole lot of time. All in all it was a great weekend and the first EWS I have successfully finished! I ended up 73rd.

The Process 153 smashed it all weekend and it was great to hang out with fellow Kona Super Grassroots rider, Ryan Gardner. – James Rennie

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

Ryan Gardner, keeps calm and consistent en route to his solid top 50 finish. Photo Sven Martin

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

Look mom, no chain. James Rennie rode all of stage six from the start gate to the finish line chain-less. Photo Sven Martin

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

James Rennie getting all colour coordinated in some fresh 2016 TLD kit , during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile. Photo Sven Martin

, during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one Valdivia, Corral, Chile.

Ryan roosts some of the hero dirt in Corral, Chilé during the 2016 Enduro World Series, round one. Photo Sven Martin

Full Results can be found here.

Freehub Magazine Review the 2016 Process 153DL “The Kona Process 153 DL is an absurdly fun bike”

The Freehub magazine guys ride the same trails as us here in Bellingham, so it only seemed fitting that we get them on a bike designed with those same trails in mind. Their review of the 2016 Process 153 DL is online now and it appears they loved the bike, I mean really LOVED it, if you don’t want to take one for a spin after reading it, well i’m guessing you work for one of our competitors. You can check out the review here (or by clicking on any of the images below).

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Bike Magazine Review 2016 Process 134 Supreme “If ever I have ridden a bike that felt like an extension of myself, this is the one.”

We love Bike Mag. And this month we love them more than usual as they have posted up this comprehensive 2016 Process 134 Supreme review. You can check out the review here (or by clicking on the image below). You can also pick up a digital copy of Bike right here and head to the work … boardroom (we know you read magazines on the throne).

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Mountain Bike Action Review the Process 134 “It really proved itself to be the best all-around rig.”

The March issue of Mountain Bike Action is out now and it features a massive Trail Bike Shootout, wouldn’t you know it, the 2016 Process 134 (spoiler alert) came out on top. Click HERE to read the full review and be sure to check out their latest issue, available where good magazines are sold as well as online.

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Kona Process Challenge Teaser

Welcome to the inaugural Process Challenge! For this premier event we gathered XC Beast Spencer Paxson, DH Destroyer Connor Fearon and FR Animal Graham Agassiz and started them atop Retallack Lodge’s Reco Peak for an all out blitz to the bottom. We placed each rider aboard a skill specific Process and awarded points for cross country power, downhill steeze and freeride flair to determine a winner. With a mountain of singletrack ahead of them, who emerged victorious at the first ever Kona Process Challenge? Find out when we release the full video at 12:00 PST Monday January 18th.

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Retallack’s Reco Peak is not the worst place to start a race. Spencer Paxson, Connor Fearon and Graham Agassiz get ready to drop in on a race for the ages. Photo: Blake Jorgenson

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World Cup DH rider Connor Fearon follows Graham Agassiz off one massive natural stepdown. Photo: Blake Jorgenson

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Spencer Paxson finds himself all alone on one seriously stunning piece of singletrack. Photo: Blake Jorgenson

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Spencer Paxson uses Retallack’s flowy singletrack to hold off an attack from Connor and Aggy. Can he hold the pole position? Photo: Blake Jorgenson

 

 

My Kona – Trevor Porter

Allow myself to introduce… Myself.

Kona is a company packed with amazing and talented people. People with families, people with cool interests and as you probably guessed, a whole bunch of people that ride.

We want you to meet these people face to face, to get to know them and have a look behind behind the scenes and to see what makes everyone here tick. The best way to do that? Throw a party, dump your keys in a bowl at the door and don a name tag.

After a bit of an internal discussion it was decided it would be best if we just opted for the name tag part of that equation and kicked the bowl of keys to the curb. Instead, we’d like you to join us at a virtual mixer. The My Kona video mixer.

To kick things off in our new My Kona series of videos we’d like to introduce you to Trevor Porter. Trevor works out of our Canadian office. Like most of us at Kona he handles a few different responsibilities. Trevor is the sales rep for British Columbia, works in the Kona Product Group and takes care of Canadian SuperGrass riders. But he can tell you all that (and more) in person.

Bike Magazine hearts The Kona Process. Again!

Wow. The folks over at Bike Magazine just can’t seem to get enough of our Process range of bikes. Vernon Felton, Bike’s web-editor and one of the main reviewers has just posted up his pick of products and tech developments that made 2015 and sitting right at the top of that list, the Process 153. Thanks Bike, we think the Process rocks too! Check below for Vernon’s words of wisdom or head to bikemag.com for the full post.

Kona Process 153

It’s not made of carbon. It’s not the lightest bike in its class. It doesn’t even have a particularly “rad” name. I couldn’t care less. Kona just killed it with this one. Hate me all you want for calling a $3,500 bike “affordable”, but when it comes to bikes that can truly perform at the highest levels for a couple seasons without some kind of thousand-dollar upgrade, well the pickings are mighty slim these days. The Process 153, however, ticks off all the boxes: quality frame, stellar geometry, great suspension, an excellenct dropper post, decent wheels and brakes and, here’s the kicker, the Process 153 is ridiculously fun to ride. Other companies have done the long top-tube, short chainstay formula in the past–plenty of companies, in fact–but Kona hit that geometry formula out of the park. You could spend more and get a lighter version, but the Process 153 motors up hills reasonably well and takes no prisoners on the way done.