Kona Process

Kona Dream Builds: Graham Beaumont’s Earthy Sea Foam Process 153 CR

The drivetrain has us intrigued. A Hope set of CNC’d cranks with an oval chainring, an XTR rear mech, and a SRAM Eagle cassette.

Hope is CNC and these cranks really show what the Barnoldswick based company can do.

Hope F20 flat pedals keep Graham firmly attached.

There’s that XTR shifter…

And the Hope Tech 3 levers.

If you didn’t know, Kona’s cable routing is UK, Australia, Japan, and NZ friendly.

Hopes’ AM Freeride 35mm stem holds Burgtec’s 800mm Ride Wide Carbon Enduro handlebar firmly in place.

The bike rolls on E13 TRS SL Carbon Race rims laced to Hope Pro 4 hubs.

Kona Dream Builds: Chainline Bikes Build “Fez” The Ultimate Process CR DL

Chainline Bikes in El Cajon, California aren’t your average bike shop. Located amidst an industrial area filled with body shops and mechanics that are there to pimp your other ride (the one with an engine) Jason Guthrie and his crew has found a niche building one-off custom bikes for their customers. Some of these are simple, changing out a bike’s wheels from the stock ones to a set of Enve’s laced to Chris Kings. Some are a little more involved and require swapping out a few more parts, but then there are the truly one-off custom builds where Jason and his team provide custom paint and decal finishes to the frame. On top of that, every single part is swapped out, some receive custom paint and decals much like the frame, the attention to detail is meticulous, and the results are always mindblowing. The latest bike to receive that treatment? This absolutely over the top 1970’s Pony Express van inspired Kona Process 153 CR DL 29 affectionately named “Fez”.

Jason has gone to town with his tribute paint job, the front to back stripes, the colors, and the gold leaf inlay. That’s right- what looks like wood paneling in the photos below is actually 22-carat gold leaf. The red in the stripes is taken from the Marzocchi forks and then tied back in via the grips and the custom ENVE decals.

You read it right, that is a 22-carat gold head tube badge!

The Gold just looks right surrounded by the ENVE Carbon M7 bar and stem combo.

But it doesn’t stop there, The gold leaf is also laced throughout the top tube branding and…

…It goes all the way back to the seat tube. Damn!

While the Red in the Marzoccchi Bomber Z1’s forms the basis of the colors used in the bike’s new paint job, the gold comes in here in the form of a custom graphics package.

I’m not sure if reflective gold vinyl stickers are an everyday option for your ENVE M7’s

Even more gold leaf in the Kona down tube graphics.

Jason just can’t help himself. Even more custom decals, this time on the SRAM XO1 Cranks.

At this point it would be rude not to spec a XX1 Eagle gold cassette, right?

Nothing on the build goes untouched.

Well, maybe not nothing. The Ergon saddle is stock.

A One Up EDC tool rounds out the cockpit,

Frame Kona Process 29 153 CR/DL
Rear Shock Fox Float X2
Fork Marzocchi Bomber Z1 170mm
Crank Arms SRAM X01 DUB 170mm
Chain Ring SRAM Eagle 32t
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB PF92
Pedals Kona Wah Wah II Alloy
Chain SRAM Eagle XX1
Cassette SRAM Eagle XX1 Gold
Rear Derailleur SRAM Eagle X01 Red
Shifters SRAM Eagle X01 Red
Brake Rotors Hope Floating Disc
Brakes Hope Callipers E4
Brake Levers Hope Tech 3’s
Headset Cane Creek 110 Series
Handlebar ENVE M7 40mm Rise
Stem ENVE M7 50mm
Grips Ergon GD1
Top Cap One Up EDC Orange
Seat Post Fox Transfer 150mm
Saddle Ergon SME3
Hubs DT Swiss 240 DT Swiss
Rims ENVE M730
Front Tire Ibex 2.4 FRC Onza BF
Rear Tire Ibex 2.4 FRC Onza BF

 

Fez would be proud!

Vital MTB Reviews the Process CR DL 29 “We cannot stress just how well this bike corners”

“We cannot stress just how well this bike corners, and we found ourselves seeking trails that had plenty of opportunities to lay the bike on edge, rather than just hauling straight down the fall line.”

I wont lie, we have been waiting with bated breath for VitalMTB’s review of the new carbon Process CR DL 29. So you can imagine how stoked we were today when Squamish based Vital MTB reviewer Joel Harwood finally published their Process review. The consensus? They love it!

“We admire Kona’s conviction to stay true to themselves. With all the pressure to constantly innovate, they have refined what they know well in order to make yet another great performer. The Process 153 CR/DL 29 is among the most entertaining bikes we have ridden to date and has a playful feel that few companies have achieved.”

Head to VitaltMTB.com now to read the in-depth review in full!

Kona Process 24 Features in the Bike Magazine Young Shredders Gift Guide

Bike Magazine has just published its holiday gift guide for all the mini-shredders in your life and taking pride of place? Yup that’s our Process 24 full suspension kids bike. You may remember it from the below video that we released a few months ago featuring Squamish ripper Max and the legend that is Graham Agassiz.

Visit your local dealer today or check konaworld.com for purchasing options in your area.

Kona Dream Builds: The Silver Shadow, George’s Process 153 CR DL 27.5

Don’t you just love Kona builds where you just know the owner has been planning the bike well before it has shown up? Well, George from Turin Bicycles in Denver, Colorado appears to fit into that camp. His very, very shiny and blinging Process 153 CR DL has definitely not been put together with random shop parts or in a hurry. The Push Industries 11-6 shock, Praxis Lyft Carbon cranks, and the custom built wheels are a testament to that. Let’s dive in and check out this Process that’s built for the Front Range!

Kicking things off with the shoes, George has built these wheels around Raceface ARC 31 Carbon 28h rims, they are laced to Onyx mate black hubs with DT Competiton spokes. Both front and rear wheels are shod with 2.6″ Schwalbe Nobby Nic’s.
The drivetrain features a set of 170mm Praxis Lyft carbon cranks with a Wolftooth CAMO spider with SS 28t ring, out back a Shimano XT M8000 derailleur works it magic on an E-thirteen TRS+ 9-46t cassette.

Up front, the 160mm Fox 36 Performance Elite hide a Push Industries ACS3 coil conversion kit.

Stopping is looked after with TRP’s Quadiem G-spec brakes w/Zee metal pads and 203/180mm Shimano RT-86 rotors.

An I9 A35 60mm stem with a 30th birthday Kona stem cap kicks things off in the cockpit. Raceface Atlas 35mm bars and Supacaz Grizips in bling silver keep your digits attached. Wolf Tooths ever popular dropper remote connects up to a 150mm Fox Transfer post as well as the final piece of the puzzle, a well-loved Specialized Elite Power saddle.

Happy Birthday to us.

 

Extended Family: Kate Meyer

Kate Meyer is the quintessential Kona rider. Living in Bend, Oregon, Kate is a Fisheries Biologist for the US Forest Service on the McKenzie River. Kate excels at fun. We like fun too, and that’s why we love Kate’s style and attitude. She rides for the good times and she RIPS on a bike. We asked Kate to answer a few questions for us about why she rides and what the scene is like for her in central Oregon.
Kate! Welcome to the Cog! Tell us where you’re from and how long you’ve been riding.
Thanks for having me on the Cog! I was born and raised in McCall, Idaho where I spent most of my time snowboarding. I moved to Ashland, Oregon for college and started mountain biking there about fourteen years ago. After my first downhill ride, I was hooked for life (despite going over the bars and shredding my hands).
What does your perfect day on a bike look like?
I had a perfect day yesterday at Black Rock with three of my favorite riding buddies. It was a loam lapping, meat hucking, stoke stirring, progression session on a beautiful sunny day in the woods. It doesn’t get much better than that!
What’s the riding scene like where you live?
Central Oregon has a pretty diverse mountain biking scene with over 300 miles of single track, dirt jumps, pump tracks, and Mt. Bachelor Bike Park. We have a very active, strong trail volunteer organization – Central Oregon Trail Alliance – that works with public land managers to build and maintain trails and advocates for the bike community. The downhill/freeride/dirt jump scene, which I’m most involved with, is small but definitely growing.
How do you fit into the cycling community there? What would you say your best contribution to the community is?
I try to be a good trail steward and dig as much as I can. And I try to be a positive force in the downhill/freeride/dirt jump community by supporting efforts to build and maintain more advanced trails, encouraging ladies to ride more aggressively, and just trying to spread the stoke that biking brings me.
Why do you choose mountain biking as your primary(?) activity?
Snowboarding was my first love, but mountain biking has become a huge part of my life. If I’m not working, I’m biking. It keeps me present, healthy, happy, and social. I have a strong drive for continued progression and growth and biking is a perfect outlet for that. And you really can’t beat the feeling of ripping down a trail with your buds!
What words of advice do you have for a) women looking to get into the sport and b) strong female riders looking to get even better?
For women looking to get into mountain biking, I would suggest signing up for a clinic or going on a ladies ride with a local bike shop – they happen all the time now. You’ll learn and progress quicker and find people to ride with. For strong female riders looking to get better, I suggest riding with people that are better than you and work on chasing them down, sessioning jumps and features, and pushing your comfort zone a little bit more each ride.
Where is your absolute favorite place to ride?
That’s a tough question – there are so many good places to ride in the PNW. I would have to say that riding Whistler Bike Park in the Fall is pretty hard to beat.
How long have you been riding a Kona?
I’ve been riding Kona bikes for about ten years, on a Minxy, a Shred, and two Process 153s. The new Process 153 is the most fun bike I’ve ever ridden! You guys nailed it!
Any fun plans for the winter?
I hope to spend my winter slashing endless white and brown pow here in Oregon. My dad lives on a sailboat in Belize and I’ll be joining him and my brother for a few weeks down there.
What does your 2019 season look like?
I plan to race the NW Cup Downhill Series and ride all over the PNW. I really want to ride more in Bellingham – that new jump trail looks so fun! My home bike park at Mt. Bachelor will be opening a new jump trail – Red Line – that is going to be insanely good, so I’ll be lapping that and learning some new tricks.
Photos: Roo Fowler/Hope Tech

Kona Dream Builds: Double Impact Naoki Idegawa’s Process 153 CR DL 27.5

Japanese Kona rider Naoki Idegawa’s Process 27.5 CR DL pulls double duty as both an enduro race bike and a lightweight DH rig. The bike is well and truly dreamy in both configurations. His motivation for building the DH version? Well, some of the short courses on Japan’s DH circuit don’t really warrant a full DH bike so Naoki transforms his Process to DH mode for the occasional race.

This is the Process in DH Guise. Magic Mary’s mounted up on Mavic Deemax hoops with a full XTR/Saint groupset and no dropper post.
Outback he’s opted for a short cage Saint rear mech and a DH cassette. The rear damping is looked after by the ever-popular Fox Float X2 Factory rear shock.
SDG’s Sam Hill pro-model seat is attached to the rigid post. Up front, Naoki is rocking a 35mm Renthal Carbon Fatbar mounted to an Apex stem.
Fox Factory 36’s to match the Float rear.

Now, these little green bolts attached to the Saint brakes and shifter are Ti, Naoki has a thing for Ti bolts as you are about to see.
Saint calipers and floating Shimano rotors… and Ti bolts.
More Ti Bolts.
Cane Creeks deluxe 110 headset and… More Ti Bolts.
Even the XTR cranks didn’t escape the ti bolt retrofitting.

On Enduro days, the wheels are swapped out for a set with Minions front and rear and a wider range cassette. The derailleur is upgraded to an XTR version and the rigid post gets swapped out for a Fox Transfer post.
Japenese riders (and all those who drive on the left side of the road) love the ability to run the rear brake line on the right of the frame, clean cable routing is important when building a dream bike.

Local Pride and a Star-Studded Soirée, Spencer Reports from a Top-10 at Trans Cascadia

Trans-Cascadia is a blind-format, backcountry enduro race held in the wilder corners of the Pacific Northwest’s Cascade Mountain Range. Previously held in Oregon, the fourth-edition of the event made its way north to the deep corners of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in south-central Washington State. This year’s edition included a heavy-hitting cast of gravity heroes, including international stars Greg Minaar, Steve Peat, Loris Vergier and more. Factory rider Spencer Paxson was on site to represent not only for Kona, but for his local heritage, having grown up just over the hill from where the race took place. For Spencer, Trans Cascadia was a full-spectrum experience of modern mountain biking, from exploration to advocacy to participation. From helping vet the quality of the routes to volunteering in pre-race work parties to finally racing the event, Spencer shares with us his special account from this piece of MTB goodness. 

I credit the terrain around Trout Lake, WA and the greater Gifford Pinchot National Forest for inspiring my deep connection with sport and the outdoors. When I was informed that Trans Cascadia would be venturing to this area for 2018, I leapt at the opportunity to help out. From writing letters of support to the local USFS districts to participating in trail work days, my connection to the region gave me the sense that I owed a concerted effort to support the Trans Cascadia crew and their terrific event. My family’s history goes deep with these forests, including four generations of a family-owned timber and sawmill business and many years of my grandfather and father flying surveillance patrols for the US Forest Service. Not to mention my own experience growing up in these hills. Now, as the economic landscape continues to evolve, it is inspiring to think of mountain biking becoming a more important part of the recreational activities in the area. What better way than to usher it in with revamped trail systems and a world-class event!

I never dreamed I would share these trails alongside 100 other like-minded mountain bikers, let alone legends of the sport whom I’ve looked up to throughout my cycling career. To be clear, this was the zone where I would often go to be solo, or perhaps accompanied by a stalwart family member or friend. I even performed my marriage proposal on one of these trails! This was the zone where I fostered my “benign masochism” on long rides and bushed-out loops with heinous amounts of vertical ascent and frequent hike-a-bikes. But the reward of alpine vistas and remote singletrack was always worth the effort. Fast-forward a decade-and-change later and there I was sharing the same routes with a dozen good friends, trading high fives and trail snacks with the likes of Steve Peat and Greg Minaar, and being able to reassure others with local knowledge of: “don’t worry, it’s almost the top”.

Speaking of more meet-and-greet, the video above captures perhaps the best “nice to meet you” moment I’ve ever experienced. If you follow the big mountain ski world, you’ll get a kick out of it. If not, the running commentary is entertainment enough.

For all the fun that was had, the week was not without a healthy reminder of the fragility of pleasure and the sheer remoteness of the place we were riding. On Day 1, a long time fellow pro racer and friend dropped in ahead of me on Stage 2 and ended up losing control and impacting a tree. I had given enough of a gap on the high-speed stage that I didn’t notice that he had sailed off into the woods until after waiting at the bottom when he was nowhere to be found. After a few riders passed without seeing him, I notified the stage timers and medic and ran back up the trail. Sure enough, my friend was a few minutes run up the hill and laid out on a gentle slope below the trail. The thought that I had ridden past him without seeing gave me a pit in my stomach. A medic and I arrived on scene at nearly the same time and began to administer care (I have my WFR precisely because of these backcountry activities…it’s not much, but it’s far better than nothing). As difficult as it was to see a friend in so much distress, and as scary as the uncertainty of injuries was in the first hour, it was amazing to witness the clockwork of the Trans Cascadia medical crew and staff as they switched-on to expert care for my friend while keeping the rest of the event running smoothly and out of the fray. I can’t speak highly enough of the medical crew and organizers for rallying the way they did to ensure safety and care. After three tough hours, my friend was able to get up and move out on the back of a motorcycle. As for me, I coasted out the last two stages of the day, race brain totally fried.

Mike Thomas

Thanks to Day 1’s strong reminder of two-wheeled hubris, I had the mind to savor and respect Days 2-4. We were still deep in the woods, and any serious incident meant a long wait and (likely) helicopter ride at best. That said, topic for a future piece is the phenomenon of continued risk-taking in the wake of incident. There are so many angles to open up on that topic that I’ll save it for later, but suffice it to say, I didn’t feel like I slowed down despite the experience of my friend’s crash. And I wouldn’t have gone any faster, either. F#@(%…it felt fast!! And on average I was still 3% off pace. I’m happy leaving that remaining sliver to the forest gods. That said, over the next three days I managed to eke out a top-3 and a few top-5 stage placings, which seemed remarkable to me (and scary/exciting?). Maybe everyone else slowed down? Whatever the case, the local pride probably had something to do with it. Witnessing everyone’s enjoyment of the trails and terrain gave me that special form of joy that comes from sharing with others. In that way, I don’t think I’ve ever been more excited to have my ass handed to me on fairly familiar trails than by the likes of the international gravity stars in attendance.

Chris Hornbecker

In the end, we grimy bunch of mountain biking adults spent 4-days feeling like 19-year-olds with no curfew, no homework, and European drinking privileges. Our cups runneth’d over. I bathed in cold streams and lakes each evening, ate delicious food, and shared lifetime good laughs and high-speed trail sensations with old friends and new ones. As for the racing part, I got myself to 9th place (FULL RESULTS HERE). The morning after the race, a bunch of us loaded into a truck and started the long drive back home. On the way we stopped in sleepy little Trout Lake. There was the gas station and cafe as it always had been each morning before school started, the mountain looming over the valley. I was a visitor in my own home this time, but there was a new twist that felt good. It had been put on everyone else’s map, and in this capacity, it felt really good to share it. I hope people come back. I certainly will!

Thanks for reading.

Photo credits: Mike Thomas and Chris Hornbecker

Kona Dream Builds: Rich’s Deep Purple Process 153 CR 27.5

Some of you may have seen Richard’s beautiful one-off custom painted Process 153 CR DL on Pink Bike’s Instagram feed recently. Well, we’d spied it a while back and asked Rich if he could shed any light on what drove him to build and custom paint his brand new G2 Process and send us a few more detailed images. Luckily for us (and you) he obliged and sent this set of fantastic photos and a complete build list as well as his reasoning and motivation for the build.

My previous bike was a 2015 process 153 with an Ohlins coil and I loved that thing so much. It, unfortunately, had plenty of dents and the like from its share of tomahawks and crashes and late last year I ended up breaking it. It wasn’t even a choice, I went and ordered the ’18 carbon frame immediately to replace it.

I’d been waiting for an excuse to send something to my friend James Terrani of Archetype Paint Studio so a new bike seemed perfect (especially since two of my riding buddies ended up getting the same one). I was pretty set on purple from early on but it wasn’t till James showed me some samples of candy and transparent things he could do we were able to go a little further. The whole bike is one color, he created a subtle fade on the front triangle layering the transparent paint and then did a lot more layers to get the rear end as dark as I wanted it. (I was a big fan of the old Process paint jobs with a colored front and black rear triangle).

I couldn’t be more stoked on how the paint came out. The only new bits on the bike are the Ohlins shock, because it’s a new size and mounting this year and then the gold i9s hubs to Spank Oozy 350 rims to finish it off. Mostly the other bits moved over from the old bike, even the head tube badge and I’m still rocking my OG Wah Wah pedals.

Rear Shock Ohlins TTX 22 coil
Fork Rock Shox Pike
Headset Cane Creek
Handlebar Giant contact SL
Stem Truvativ
Grips ODI
Brakes Shimano Zee
Shifters Shimano XT
Rear Derailleur Shimano XT
Cranks Shimano XT
Chainrings / Sprocket Shimano XT 32t
Bottom Bracket Shimano
Chain Shimano
Cassette / Rear Cog Shimano
Pedals Kona Wah Wah
Rims Spank Oozy 350
Hubs I9
Spokes DT Comp
Front Tire Vittoria Martello DH / Cushcore (THE BEST)
Rear Tire Vittoria Martello DH / Cushcore
Saddle WTB
Seatpost KS Lev Integra
Weight Not light

My Kona – Scott Mackay

Scott Mackay is most definitely a product of his environment. Growing up at the base of Mt. Seymour on Vancouver’s famed North Shore, riding and skiing has been a part of his daily routine for as long as he can remember. For Kona dealers and colleagues that have the privilege to ride with Scott on his home trails – or any trails for that matter – they are served a master class of bike handling and style with a side of humility. Scott lets his riding do the talking and we think you’ll agree…

Kona Dream Builds: Matty’s Slow Burning Custom Process 153 AL DL

Part-time trail builder and part-time ice cream slinger (and Squamish BC local) Matt Harris had a long time to ponder his 153 Process AL 29 build. He sold his old 27.5 model before we announced the G2 Process, and he spent the last few months waiting for the frame only version to arrive in Canada. Relegated (that’s not a bad thing) to his steel Honzo, Matt was constantly plotting just how rad he could make this bike. The result, as we are sure you’ll agree, was well worth the wait.


The drivetrain is truly custom. Race Face Next SL carbon cranks transfer power to a One Up Switch chainring. Out back, an XTR rear derailleur mates to a One Up’d 45t rear XTR cassette. 

A Rock Shox Lyrik, with its flawless Charger damper, keep things plush up front, while weight is saved with One Up’s toolless front axle. Saint brakes provide ample stopping power while Industry Nine hubs laced to carbon rims keep things rolling fast and smooth.

Bike Yoke’s Revive 185mm dropper post’s are starting to pop up more and more these days. Matt’s inclusion is one of the first we’ve seen on a Process and hot damn it looks nice. The only thing carried over from Matt’s previous build is that well broken in Chromag Trail master saddle.

A little custom detail from one of Matt’s day jobs reminding him that those trails don’t build themselves.

Remmeber those Saint calipers? Well, they are hooked up to these XTR levers for straight-up sex appeal. The levers and Easton Grips are all mounted on a classic Chromag 35mm BZA bar via a sweet Chris King stem and Race Face Atlas 35mm stem.

A sweet gold colored One Up EDC top cap provides a home for Matts EDC tool and rounds of this perfectly executed Kona Dream build.

Kona Dream Builds: Josh Cooper Keeps it Local with his Process 153 CR

Josh Cooper is the lead mechanic at Epic Cycles, a bike shop outside of Asheville NC and rides mostly in the backcountry of Pisgah National Forest, famous for its technical terrain and rugged character that can be demanding on equipment. He built up his bike to be light and comfortable enough for all-day rides yet burly and strong enough for the terrain he has in the area.

“Asheville is home to some incredible component manufacturers like Cane Creek and Industry Nine so I tried to highlight those local parts in my build. This bike is the most fun ride I’ve ever had and when I ride it I feel like I can ride anything. It has really opened up my potential as a rider and I can’t wait to see where it takes me.”

Here’s some specs and key details:

Frame: 2018 Process 153 Carbon Large
Fork: Cane Creek Helm Air 160 w/custom gold stickers from Cane Creek- Perfect match
Wheels: Industry Nine Enduro 305 – made right across the street from my house
Drivetrain: Shimano XT 11 speed – tried and true.
Cassette: E*13 Trsr 9-46 – Light weight and massive 512% range
Chain: KMC X11 TiNitride Gold
Cranks: Raceface Next R with Wolftooth 32t Oval ring. Wheels Mfg BB.
Brakes: Shimano XT 180/180
Handlebar: RF SixC 35
Grips: Ergon GE1
Seatpost: KS Lev Intergra 175mm w/ Cane Creek Dropt Lever. Could not resist Salsa Gold Clamp.
Headset: Cane Creek 110 Gold
Pedals: Shimano XTR
Tires: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.6F/2.3R
Shock: Stock RS Deluxe – I’d like to try the Cane Creek Coil[il] when it is available in metric sizing
Weight: 31 lbs

31.01 lbs… With 2.6 rubber and pedals!