Process

Kona Dream Builds: Double Impact Naoki Idegawa’s Process 153 CR DL 27.5

Japanese Kona rider Naoki Idegawa’s Process 27.5 CR DL pulls double duty as both an enduro race bike and a lightweight DH rig. The bike is well and truly dreamy in both configurations. His motivation for building the DH version? Well, some of the short courses on Japan’s DH circuit don’t really warrant a full DH bike so Naoki transforms his Process to DH mode for the occasional race.

This is the Process in DH Guise. Magic Mary’s mounted up on Mavic Deemax hoops with a full XTR/Saint groupset and no dropper post.
Outback he’s opted for a short cage Saint rear mech and a DH cassette. The rear damping is looked after by the ever-popular Fox Float X2 Factory rear shock.
SDG’s Sam Hill pro-model seat is attached to the rigid post. Up front, Naoki is rocking a 35mm Renthal Carbon Fatbar mounted to an Apex stem.
Fox Factory 36’s to match the Float rear.

Now, these little green bolts attached to the Saint brakes and shifter are Ti, Naoki has a thing for Ti bolts as you are about to see.
Saint calipers and floating Shimano rotors… and Ti bolts.
More Ti Bolts.
Cane Creeks deluxe 110 headset and… More Ti Bolts.
Even the XTR cranks didn’t escape the ti bolt retrofitting.

On Enduro days, the wheels are swapped out for a set with Minions front and rear and a wider range cassette. The derailleur is upgraded to an XTR version and the rigid post gets swapped out for a Fox Transfer post.
Japenese riders (and all those who drive on the left side of the road) love the ability to run the rear brake line on the right of the frame, clean cable routing is important when building a dream bike.

KONA GDURO TEAM COMPETES IN ENDURO2 DAVOS RACE

Coming to the end of a long season we decided to race in the special Enduro2 mountain bike event.

This event was held for the second time and is now one of our top 10 favorite races ever done.

Like a regular enduro race, Enduro2 offers several timed stages per day. All competitors start in a double team in the category Men, Mixed and Women. Within three race days, all teams cover a total of 120km race distance, climb almost 1500 vertical meters and ride nearly 12000 meters downhill natural tracks from rocky high alpine to loose and rooty forest soil.

Our Process 153 custom bikes were well prepared with gravity tires, big rotors, and new brake pads.

But sometimes the devil is in the detail.

 

After playing a little safe at day one with just two of sixteen stages we found ourselves in the top 60 of the 160 team strong men field, knowing that there is a good amount of space to raise the speed.

Day two was the toughest race day with eight stages and a good amount of rough sections on the high alpine parts. Raising the speed from stage to stage we decided to change the team order on stage six. Matthias on his 27.5 Process was now in the lead with me on the 29inch Process following.

“Never touch a running system,” they say and this seemed to be so true as stage six was an absolute waterloo for our team. We destroyed both rear wheels and had four flats in one stage, and spent all our spare tubes and cartridges. Matthias even had to carry his bike down to the finish. This disaster cost us more than 30 minutes additional time and let us fall back to one of the last positions of the field.

But we stood motivated as this race had a very special family character and a few of the best alpine trails in the Swiss Alps. Unfortunately, on stage nine Matthias punctured again which added another nine minutes to the total stage time.

Looking from the very back of the field day three was just to enjoy the last six stages and stunning views for us. We kept on raising the groundspeed and had most stage times in the top 30s or 40s overpassing two or three teams on every stage. This of course had no impact on our total time.

At the end of the race weekend, we must say this was one of the best races, except from the mechanicals, we ever competed in. Very well organized from a highly motivated trail crew in a stunning  location.

We’ll be back next year!

Hannah Bergemann Takes the 2018 CDC Overall!

We wrapped up an awesome race season for the Cascadia Dirt Cup this last weekend at Tiger Mountain in Issaquah, WA. If you haven’t visited this place yet, its worth a trip! Evergreen has been working hard to build and maintain tons of brand new trails, and they are a blast!

We got to race the fresh tracks with tons of greasy roots, rocks, and peanut butter mud to keep things interesting.

 

Stage 1 raced down a new trail called EBAD that was full of greasy, off-camber, rooty goodness. Stage 2 transferred over to Legend & MegaFauna. This stage was my favorite of the day with some on-trail doubles and steep sections.

Stage 3 took us down another new trail called NOTG which was less steep than EBAD, but a bit sloppier creating some long peanut-butter mud sections.

Photo: Erik Mickelson

Stage 4 started back at the top for a final run down the infamous Predator. This trail is one of my favorites and feels like a downhill race track with high speeds, big jumps, and rock gardens. This trail is always rowdy and a great way to finish the race and season!

I’m super happy with my second Pro season and stoked to finish strong and healthy! I finished the day in 2nd, and took the CDC Pro womens overall title! Huge, Ginormous Thank you to Trey, Camille and crew at Race Cascadia for all your hard work and amazing events this season! And for donating over $100,000 back to the local trail building organizations in the PNW to keep building more amazing trails!

Thank You to everyone who has and continues to support me in my bike riding endeavors! It’s been so much fun, and I’m looking forward for next season!

Kona BikesTenet ComponentsStoked RoastersTerrain GymHigh AboveMarzocchi MTBDakineESI gripsSmith OpticsHand-Up Gloves, & of course all my friends and family

Hannah B.

Crankworx 2018

It’s been a whirlwind week as we wrapped up Crankworx Whistler, 2018 this past week. We rode the rollercoaster of a parched and smokey Whistler, BC for 10 days and what a ride it was!

With no official booth on site, we spent most of our week competing in events, catching up with old industry friends, and riding some of the best trails in the world.

Kona athletes had a strong showing in the EWS, Speed and Style, Air Downhill, Whip Offs, and the Canadian Open.

The Riders

Tristan Lemere, who took first place in the men’s junior category for Air DH AND Canadian Open DH!

 

EWS racer Alexander Kangas

 

EWS racer Scott Countryman

 

EWS racer and Kona Supreme, Hannah Bergemann

 

Super stylish mega whip master, Caleb Holonko

 

Downhill racer Anthony Poulson

 

Downhill racer and current holder of the #10 world ranking, Connor Fearon

 

Master of style and going big, Graham Agassiz

 

The Action

Kangas on course at the EWS

 

Bergemann navigating the Whistler forests during the EWS

 

Countryman on his way to 69th place in the EWS

 

Lemere on his way to victory in the Air Downhill

 

Kangas finished 35th on the iconic A Line track

 

Connor Fearon seems to really love the number 10. 10th place in the Air DH for the Aussi.

 

Anthony Poulson on A Line

 

Caleb Holonko in Speed and Style

 

Fearon going big in Whip Worlds

 

Aggy always gets sideways during Whip Worlds. Unfortunately, he went down and broke his scapula. Here’s hoping for a quick recovery!

 

Holonko made it to finals and was boosting huge the entire session.

 

Holonko in the stratosphere

 

Connor on his way to a scorching 2nd place in the Canadian Open DH.

Tristan Lemere taking his second gold of the week at the Canadian Open DH!

Congrats to all of the athletes and their amazing results. That’s a wrap for Cranwkorx 2018!

My Kona – Scott Mackay

Scott Mackay is most definitely a product of his environment. Growing up at the base of Mt. Seymour on Vancouver’s famed North Shore, riding and skiing has been a part of his daily routine for as long as he can remember. For Kona dealers and colleagues that have the privilege to ride with Scott on his home trails – or any trails for that matter – they are served a master class of bike handling and style with a side of humility. Scott lets his riding do the talking and we think you’ll agree…

Becky Gardner Finishes Salida 720 12 Hour Solo!

Kona Rider Becky Gardner recently completed her first 12-hour solo race aboard her Process in Salida, Colorado at the Salida 720. She was the only female solo finisher! Congrats Becky! Check out her race report below.

 

After a few weeks of racing, riding, and traveling around Northern California I finally made the trip back to Salida, Colorado where I call home for the majority of the year. Although Salida is home to countless amazing biking trails, we rarely see many races taking place on the amazing terrain. Except for this year, thanks to my friend Keith Darner of Chocolate Bunny Productions, Salida was to host its first 12-hour race on Cinco De Mayo called the Salida 720. The race uses Salida’s S Mountain trails system which is jammed packed of technical, rocky, and loose terrain, making it far more technical than most other 12 hour races. Being primarily a downhill racer most my life, the thought of doing a 12-hour race was terrifying to me, but I put fear aside and decided I was going to participate in the local event anyways. To really top off my 12-hour experience I decided to push my limits and to do the race solo!

Getting hooked into a last minute surf/bike trip to Santa Barbara, I showed up from my month-long California trip the day before the race started which didn’t give me much time to prepare. I had just enough time to quickly get my bike tuned as well as I could and try to get a good night’s sleep before the long event started. My mechanic and beastly single speed endurance racer friend, Andrea gave me some advice saying to just ride slow and take my time.

The morning of the race 130 plus racers lined up on Salida’s F Street Bridge ready for a good old fashion Le Mans start. As the whistle blew and we ran to our bikes at 7 am, I remember Andrea’s words and tried to get in the back of the pack. This was almost more mentally harder than riding for 12 hours straight. Being a competitive person I had to let people pass me as I watched them charge up the hill into the trails. I had to tame my inner competitive nature and let it go as I took my time up the hill. In a 12 hour race, a majority of the people are on teams of 2,3, or 4. These people will be doing only a couple laps as they relay with their partner while the solo riders will be riding all day alone. Throughout the long tiring day, you’re passed by fresh riders doing their first lap of the day.

 

The start of the race did not go ideally as a few minutes into the race as I started climbing I realized that the cassette on my bike was not working like it should. I had two working gears and was forced to ride the 15-mile course as a single speed. Luckily my awesome boyfriend who was filming at the race got someone to bring a spare wheel to the bike to the shop, and after my second lap of single speeding I was able to swap out wheels and was dialed for the rest of the race.

 

I was feeling good on the bike and was having way more fun than I thought I would. Usually only participating in races that you’re sprinting the entire time it is nice to do a race that allows you to pedal at a reasonable pace. That is until I got into lap 4. This was around mile 50 when Colorado’s intense afternoon sun decided to beat down on us. I slowly finished my lap and was 100% convinced I was done for the day. I sat down at my pit, tired and beat from the day, my friends and other participants tried to convince me that I should be super proud of how much I had ridden. I wasn’t satisfied and I knew I wanted to do another lap and finish the race strong but I just wasn’t sure I could make it happen. And just in the nick of time, some local Salida shredding galpals showed up and gave me a little pep talk and I knew I could get it done. So I headed out at 5 pm for my 5th and last lap of the day. To my surprise, this lap was the easiest of the day! Turns out after a while your body stops trying to convince you to stop, and I finished the day with ease.

After riding from 7 am to 7 pm I finished the day up being the only woman to do the race solo and completed 5 laps which is about 75 miles of technical single track- definitely the most techy trail I have ever ridden in a day. Three years ago I was strictly racing downhill and now I am competing in 12 hour races as a solo athlete…. Times sure have changed!

All photos by Curtis Gillen.

Bicycling Magazine Loves the Process

“Whether you’re on slow technical trails or high-speed terrain littered with loose, rocky ruts, the 153 is predictable, balanced, and easy to control.”

-Daniel Sapp, Bicycling Magazine

This week Bicycling listed seven reasons why they love the Kona Process! We think it’s pretty great too, but we may be a little biased. Check out their full list here

If you haven’t seen our videos featuring the Process, be sure to check them out!

 

Ali and Hannah absolutely shredding on the Process 153 CR.

A little love from the Alps!

Squamish riding at its finest!

Disco Process

It’s International Women’s Day and we’re celebrating by showing off some of our favorite lady rippers, Hannah Bergemann and Ali Osgood. Hannah and Ali are riding the Kona Process 153 CR, a bike made for everyone- men, women, Wookies, you name it. Thanks to all of the amazing female athletes and industry heavy hitters that keep us rolling!

Hannah Bergemann

Ali Osgood

 


Video by Axl Fostvedt and Joonas Vinnari
Photos by Caleb Smith
Awesome riding by Ali Osgood and Hannah Bergemann

Kona Demo Tour in Anthem, AZ and at the Sedona MTB Fest!

The 2018 Kona Demo Tour is coming to Anthem, AZ TOMORROW, February 27th, at Freedom Cycles from 12-4pm. We’ll also be at the Sedona MTB Festival this weekend. Check out details below and come test ride a new Process 153 CR 27.5Process 153 AL/DL 29, Hei Hei Trail CRHonzo AL/DL or the brand new Satori DL!

 

For the full schedule be sure to check out the Demo Tour page!