Process

Becky Gardner Finishes Salida 720 12 Hour Solo!

Kona Rider Becky Gardner recently completed her first 12-hour solo race aboard her Process in Salida, Colorado at the Salida 720. She was the only female solo finisher! Congrats Becky! Check out her race report below.

 

After a few weeks of racing, riding, and traveling around Northern California I finally made the trip back to Salida, Colorado where I call home for the majority of the year. Although Salida is home to countless amazing biking trails, we rarely see many races taking place on the amazing terrain. Except for this year, thanks to my friend Keith Darner of Chocolate Bunny Productions, Salida was to host its first 12-hour race on Cinco De Mayo called the Salida 720. The race uses Salida’s S Mountain trails system which is jammed packed of technical, rocky, and loose terrain, making it far more technical than most other 12 hour races. Being primarily a downhill racer most my life, the thought of doing a 12-hour race was terrifying to me, but I put fear aside and decided I was going to participate in the local event anyways. To really top off my 12-hour experience I decided to push my limits and to do the race solo!

Getting hooked into a last minute surf/bike trip to Santa Barbara, I showed up from my month-long California trip the day before the race started which didn’t give me much time to prepare. I had just enough time to quickly get my bike tuned as well as I could and try to get a good night’s sleep before the long event started. My mechanic and beastly single speed endurance racer friend, Andrea gave me some advice saying to just ride slow and take my time.

The morning of the race 130 plus racers lined up on Salida’s F Street Bridge ready for a good old fashion Le Mans start. As the whistle blew and we ran to our bikes at 7 am, I remember Andrea’s words and tried to get in the back of the pack. This was almost more mentally harder than riding for 12 hours straight. Being a competitive person I had to let people pass me as I watched them charge up the hill into the trails. I had to tame my inner competitive nature and let it go as I took my time up the hill. In a 12 hour race, a majority of the people are on teams of 2,3, or 4. These people will be doing only a couple laps as they relay with their partner while the solo riders will be riding all day alone. Throughout the long tiring day, you’re passed by fresh riders doing their first lap of the day.

 

The start of the race did not go ideally as a few minutes into the race as I started climbing I realized that the cassette on my bike was not working like it should. I had two working gears and was forced to ride the 15-mile course as a single speed. Luckily my awesome boyfriend who was filming at the race got someone to bring a spare wheel to the bike to the shop, and after my second lap of single speeding I was able to swap out wheels and was dialed for the rest of the race.

 

I was feeling good on the bike and was having way more fun than I thought I would. Usually only participating in races that you’re sprinting the entire time it is nice to do a race that allows you to pedal at a reasonable pace. That is until I got into lap 4. This was around mile 50 when Colorado’s intense afternoon sun decided to beat down on us. I slowly finished my lap and was 100% convinced I was done for the day. I sat down at my pit, tired and beat from the day, my friends and other participants tried to convince me that I should be super proud of how much I had ridden. I wasn’t satisfied and I knew I wanted to do another lap and finish the race strong but I just wasn’t sure I could make it happen. And just in the nick of time, some local Salida shredding galpals showed up and gave me a little pep talk and I knew I could get it done. So I headed out at 5 pm for my 5th and last lap of the day. To my surprise, this lap was the easiest of the day! Turns out after a while your body stops trying to convince you to stop, and I finished the day with ease.

After riding from 7 am to 7 pm I finished the day up being the only woman to do the race solo and completed 5 laps which is about 75 miles of technical single track- definitely the most techy trail I have ever ridden in a day. Three years ago I was strictly racing downhill and now I am competing in 12 hour races as a solo athlete…. Times sure have changed!

All photos by Curtis Gillen.

Bicycling Magazine Loves the Process

“Whether you’re on slow technical trails or high-speed terrain littered with loose, rocky ruts, the 153 is predictable, balanced, and easy to control.”

-Daniel Sapp, Bicycling Magazine

This week Bicycling listed seven reasons why they love the Kona Process! We think it’s pretty great too, but we may be a little biased. Check out their full list here

If you haven’t seen our videos featuring the Process, be sure to check them out!

 

Ali and Hannah absolutely shredding on the Process 153 CR.

A little love from the Alps!

Squamish riding at its finest!

Disco Process

It’s International Women’s Day and we’re celebrating by showing off some of our favorite lady rippers, Hannah Bergemann and Ali Osgood. Hannah and Ali are riding the Kona Process 153 CR, a bike made for everyone- men, women, Wookies, you name it. Thanks to all of the amazing female athletes and industry heavy hitters that keep us rolling!

Hannah Bergemann

Ali Osgood

 


Video by Axl Fostvedt and Joonas Vinnari
Photos by Caleb Smith
Awesome riding by Ali Osgood and Hannah Bergemann

Kona Demo Tour in Anthem, AZ and at the Sedona MTB Fest!

The 2018 Kona Demo Tour is coming to Anthem, AZ TOMORROW, February 27th, at Freedom Cycles from 12-4pm. We’ll also be at the Sedona MTB Festival this weekend. Check out details below and come test ride a new Process 153 CR 27.5Process 153 AL/DL 29, Hei Hei Trail CRHonzo AL/DL or the brand new Satori DL!

 

For the full schedule be sure to check out the Demo Tour page!

Bike Love

It’s Valentine’s Day. For lots of people that means romance, fancy meals, and way too many heart-themed things.

At Kona, we also want to share the love of our favorite bikes with you. So from the bottom of our sappy little hearts, this is an ode to the bikes we are currently loving the most.

Amanda Bryan, Sales: I love the way the Process 153 sucks up the trail and pops around. It boosts confidence in the steep chunder and loves to get sideways and rowdy.

 

Jordan Sembler, Sales: This is my “One that got away” Valentine bike: “I miss my sweet baby blue Sutra LTD. She stood by me for more miles than any other bike I have had in recent memory and what did I do? I sold her for the next hottest thing… Looking back is always hindsight. She is truly the one that got away and I have to live with that. I just hope that she is happy with her new partner and looks back on our time together as fondly as I do…. I sure hope my Rove LTD doesn’t read this…”

Product Team members Justin Clements and Ian Schmitt: Justin says, “Me and my friend Ian riding a rock roll together in Squamish BC at the MY17 Kona Launch. He’s riding a Big Honzo and I’m riding a Hei Hei Trail CR.”

Product Team member Mark Allison: I love the Operator because who doesn’t love riding big bikes down gnarly terrain? It always means you’re in the woods with your buddies.

Molly Joyce, Sales: This is my Process 111. It was a party! What a sleeper of a bike. It had a way of getting you into spicy situations and at the same time see you out like a champ. I had some of my favorite rides on that bike.

Kona Adventure Team Member Spencer Paxson: My Hei Hei and Process 111 in foreground. Valentines big and small, and bikes of all kinds. Bikes + love and families + bikes = love.

Kona CX Racer Kerry Werner: My “Kona Valentine” is the Superjake. First, and foremost, it is fast as hell on the cx course! Enough said. Secondly, it is so versatile. As the CX season was winding down I was planning as many different bike packing adventures and big gravel rides I think of. Basically, this bike gets me excited to spend copious amounts of time in the saddle.

Scott McKay Sales: Gotta love a Wo and Fireball Whiskey on a cold afternoon like this. Wo+Whiskey= Love

Garry Davoren, Distributor: Who doesn’t love a Ti Honzo?

 

Kona Athlete Hannah Bergemann: The Honzo climbs with ease, which encourages me to ride longer and further. It’s insanely confidence-inspiring and stable, yet still super playful on the descents, and it has me wanting to hit all the jumps and features I can find. I can pack it up with gear for an overnight bike packing trip, or rally it down some of my favorite downhill trails. I’ve been riding the Honzo for a few months now and have taken it to most of my favorite trails in Bellingham. I’ve had a blast riding long XC routes in Mazama, WA and descending technical, rock-filled trails in Squamish. The Honzo made me reconsider my opinion of hardtail bikes, and I feel like I have yet to find the limits of this bike. Looking forward to many more miles on this bike!

Lacy Kemp, Marketing: My Process 153 CR DL is always up for diving into the steepest pitches. The steeper the better!

Kona freerider Graham Agassiz on his custom Operator: This is my favourite bike for a lot of reasons but the two biggest ones would be it’s 26″ and it’s a rainbow trout!

Happy Valentines Day to you and your bikes, from all of us at Kona!

Mountain Bike Action Reviews the Process CR DL 27.5 “The Process tracked the trail like a cheetah chasing a gazelle”

“On wide-open, high-speed trails, the Process tracked the trail like a cheetah chasing a gazelle. The only difference was it could also hunt down any bonus lines it could find along the way. It’s a quick but confidence-inspiring bike.”

Mountain Bike Action reviewed the Process CR DL 27.5 in their February issue and we have the full review right here on the Cog.

Click here or on the image below to read the full review as a high res PDF or head to the Mountain Bike Action website to read it online here.

Winterized: Part 3

Welcome back to Winterized, our unofficial guide for how to make riding in the winter suck significantly less. We’re taking tips from Kona employees and athletes on how they manage to stay warm and dry(ish) in the dark, dank months. So, grab a toddy, stoke your fire, and check out the next iteration of Winterized!

 

Name: Trevor Torres
Kona gig: Warranty Service/Demo Manager
Bike of choice: Honzo with Maxxis Minions
How Trevor gets Winterized:

“I like to wear insulated gloves 40 and below.  Not waterproof as they always end up soaking from the inside, but ones with high breathability.
I also like to have a bin with dry warm clothes, towel, and shoes for after the ride.”

Name: Lacy Kemp
Kona gig: Communications Manager/New Kid on the Block
Bike of choice: Process 153 CR/DL
How Lacy gets Winterized:

“I ride a ton in the winter-mostly at night, and mostly alone, so no one hears me complaining about my numb hands. Speaking of numb hands, I’ll start with that. Apparently, I have terrible circulation, so keeping my hands and toes warm is a huge challenge. My saving grace has been Hot Hands Toe Warmers. I use them in my shoes (on the top of my toes) and shove them in the backs of my gloves when things get super cold. I prefer the toe warmers because they are flatter and have an adhesive so they don’t slip around. These things have turned what would have been a miserable day into so many good rides. Buy them in bulk from Amazon for the best deal.

Living in Bellingham means we have a lot of wet to deal with. Getting a good fender setup can be critical to both your vision and keeping your bike cleaner. There are lots of cool companies, but we have a new local company I’m excited about. Ground Keeper is by a Bellingham’s Keely Shannon, who is also part of the brains behind the super artsy Made Rad by Tony name. So, my Process looks awesome even when it’s muddy outside, I’m supporting a local business, and my face and bike are happier.

Another thing I do is deflate my tire pressure juuuuust a wee bit on those super wet days. I’m still learning what pressures work best for me, but with my Minions front and rear, I’m tinkering with around 19ish PSI. I’m a light rider so it’s definitely helpful when the tires grip the grease a bit better with softer rubber.

Lastly, if I’m riding with a pack, I’ll often take an extra jersey and pair of gloves to change into at the top of a climb. Nothing sucks more than dropping into a big descent with a sweaty, cold jersey and wet hands.”


Name: Joey Melweski
Kona gig: Warehouse Manager
Bike of choice:Process 153 CR/DL
How Joey gets Winterized:

“What I like to do to make winter rides more enjoyable:

1. Happiness is a warm rum. Depending on the ride, I’ll fill up a flask with a hot toddy or hot buttered rum.  Not only do they taste amazing, it warms up your insides, acts as a hand warmer and gives you some liquid courage!

2. Leave a towel and extra set of clothes in your car. Just knowing they are there when you get back to your car can make a ride more enjoyable.

3. Extra gloves. If it’s cold and rainy, the last thing you want is cold hands. Bring an extra set to change into before you drop in.”


Name: Matt Hoffmeyer
Kona gig: Kona Bike Shop Manager
Bike of choice: Honzo set up as a steel singlespeed or Honzo CR DL.
How Matt gets Winterized:

Things like how to keep your feet dry and hands warm…. Merino Socks when cold and damp. Showers Pass Waterproof socks for the really cold & wet rides.

The best tires to run…Past couple winters I have been a big fan of the Schwalbe Magic Mary Front and Rear, but this year I am giving the Maxxis Shorty a try.

The best winter snack is a flask of bourbon

I like to use Gore Tex Shorts & Jacket. I currently have 7mesh shorts and would recommend them to anyone.

Just get out there. Once you do you’ll be stoked and have fun. Rope as many friends into your ride, and make it happen on a regular basis.

 


Winterized: Part 1

Let’s face it. If you live north of the equator there’s a decent chance you’re stuck in this weather phenomenon we call, “winter.” Perhaps you’re a skier or snowboarder and have hung up your rubber shoes in favor of wooden plans. More power to you. But, for those of you who just can’t quit your bike, we feel you. We feel you because we still have sensation in our fingers from years of trial and error of keeping our bodies somewhat temperate in cold(er), nasty weather. In fact, we have so much wonderful advice for you that we’re launching a series of posts called Winterized. Winterized features tips from Kona employees, partner and pro riders on how to best survive the winter. So grab a cup of your favorite toddy, throw another log on the fire, and soak in the advice. We’ve suffered so you don’t have to.

Name: Kevin Rutherford
Kona gig: Canada Sales/Small Parts
Bike of choice: Process
How Kevin gets Winterized:

Fall/winter is my favourite time to ride! I generally ride my Process all year long, regardless of weather and I run Minions year round.

The key riding gear I find is:

  • Warm, semi-lined base layers
  • Moto/DH/long legged pants to keep my legs clean, and avoid the mud ‘tan lines’
  • RaceFace Agent jacket
  • Bag for wet gear after the ride. Anything from a garbage bag to a dry-bag to keep the slop contained and the car dry

A couple dream gear additions would be:

  • 5×5 pop-up canopy for changing underneath
  • Mini pressure washer, either battery or cigarette-lighter powered

Name: Pat White
Kona gig: Long-time Product Manager and floral verbiage connoisseur
Bike of choice: Roadhouse and Hei Hei AL
How Pat gets Winterized:

Wool
Fenders (road) Open lug treads (MTB)
Wool
Microfleece helmet liners
Wool
Booze
Wool


Name: Molly Joyce
Kona gig: Inside sales support,
Bike of choice: Honzo
How Molly gets Winterized:

  • Best Drink: Thermos with hot Skratch Green tea electrolyte mix.
  • Snack: 100% pure Maple Syrup – the electrolytes and low glycemic sugars give you a more steady boost of energy and it just tastes like the holidays. Untapped has them in shot size packets, or if you are more wary of lots of trash, then a hip flask with maple syrup in it – just make sure you refrigerate it after your ride so it doesn’t go bad.
  • Mucky Nuts fenders.
  • A vest (Troy Lee Design, Giant, Pearl Izumi etc)– keep the core warm for sure!
  • A bandana wrapped around your neck – great for keeping you warm but more importantly for protecting your face on the bitter cold descents, and blowing all those runny boogers out.
  • Hand warmers: again, a good trick for warming up your hands if your fingers are frozen.
  • Studded tires! Mob around the trails or your frozen streets with nobby, studded tires! The most fun commuting around. Schwalbe Marathon Winters and the Ice Spiker are all rad.

Name: Kevin Thornton
Kona gig: Graphics
Bike of choice: Whichever one has fenders
How Kevin gets Winterized:

Just like everyone else, I’ve tried every type of clothing, layering, combination possible and nothing stops the rain from getting me wet. But there is one thing I swear by…gore-tex socks that I wear inside my shoes. Not the boot things that go over the shoes…those are a hassle. In my experience…dry feet = warm feet = nothing else matters.

That’s it for round one of Winterized. Stay tuned to the Cog over the coming weeks for more cold weather riding tips!

 

Getting to Know the Process G2

When we launched the revamped Process line back in late summer, Pinkbike spent a ton of time dissecting the new features of the bike. Check out their in-depth dive here. Writer Mike Levy’s a big fan of 29ers and he was partial to the AL/DL 29er, because of wheel size and cost. “The 153 AL/DL 29’s big wheels go over and through everything and, since my riding style seems to suit 29” wheels lately, I’d happily reach for the heavier bike with the cost-conscious build,” he wrote.

What’s your Process of choice?

All New Kona Process Tops the Podium at EWS Finale Ligure

Kona riders were out in force over this past week in Finale Ligure for the final round Enduro World Series. New Zealand, Sweden, Ireland, France and Canada were all represented. The physical and technical nature of the seven stages did take its toll on riders, however: Jonathan Maunsell, Alexander Kangas and Jordan Regnier all had their weekends end abruptly, but our two U21 riders, Leah Maunsell and Rhys Verner, both had weekends they will remember forever.

Rhys had an absolute stormer of a weekend. Not only did he ride the all-new Process 153 CR/DL to the top spot in the men’s U21 category by over a minute, but his time was fast enough to put him in 13th in the pro-men’s field.

Leah, who led after the first day of racing, tried her best in the tightly contested women’s U21 field to lengthen that lead on day two. She’s no stranger to the podium at EWS events but the stop step has eluded her. The final of stage would be her undoing, losing precious seconds relegating her to second place. Not the top spot she was looking for but an amazing result for the young rider all the same.

We have both Rhys and Leah‘s race reports below, along with some fantastic photos from our EWS photographer Sven Martin.

Rhys Verner

What a week for me! This was pretty much a dream trip as far as racing and fun goes. The whole week leading up to the final round of the Enduro World Series was great, going for long rides and just taking in the amazing scenery of Finale! Pre-riding the stages I felt great and right at home on the new Process 153 CR DL and I genuinely couldn’t wait to get the racing underway. The weekend started out with a 20-minute stage from the highest mountain at around 1400m and descended almost all the way back down to sea level.

I’ve always been a fan of the long stages coming from XC but this stage went better than I could have hoped for. I ended up pulling a 39-second lead on the 2nd place U21 rider and had by far my best stage result ever with a time that would have had me 5th in the Elite men’s category. The rest of the day I tried to ride smooth and just stay within my limits as to not toss away the lead. I ended day one with a 36-second lead in U21 and ranked 7th overall.

Day two I woke up again ecstatic to get the racing underway and pedaled up to the stages full of energy and just living the dream. I again rode smooth throughout the stages and ended up winning stages four, five, and six, with one stage left to go I had a 1:14 lead on the nearest competitor. Stage 7 was a rough stage so I played it on the safer side as to get down in one piece and secured my first EWS win with an overall time that would have placed me 13th in the pro men’s field.

I am coming away from this race with a lot of confidence knowing that I can ride with the best and really couldn’t be happier with how the week went! – Rhys Verner

Leah Maunsell

Coming into day two with a 9-second lead after the first day’s racing was great, but I knew it was going to be a tight battle right until the end. With a 50km loop and 1300m of climbing to tackle it was going to be a tough day in the saddle. I was delighted to be battling it out for the top step right until the last stage but missed out by 12 seconds. I could say that I’m a little disappointed, but how could you after a great week riding in Finale Ligure. Getting to finish off my season with some really tight racing and ending it on the beach with some gelato with your mates was amazing! – Leah Maunsell

Le nouveau Kona Process G2 est là !

Le Kona Process est synonyme de progression et nous ne nous sommes pas reposés sur nos lauriers. Le Process G2 représente une évolution du vélo joueur et polyvalent qu’a toujours été le Process, avec une optimisation de la cinématique apportant des performances au pédalage largement supérieures, mais aussi des roulements plus grands pour une meilleure rigidité et un tout nouveau cadre en carbone ou en aluminium. La hauteur reste faible pour offrir un bon dégagement, les bases sont courtes, et nous avons augmenté la profondeur d’insertion de la tige de selle afin que les riders de toutes tailles puissent profiter de tiges de selle télescopiques de plus grand débattement. Avons-nous précisé que le Process G2 peut recevoir un porte-bidon ? Non ? Eh bien le Process peut recevoir un porte-bidon. Ouais, nous avons fait tout cela. Parce que nous vous aimons.



 



 

Un tout nouveau cadre carbone est au cœur du projet Process G2. Nous l’avons développé autour d’un amortisseur au standard métrique et en fixation trunion afin d’obtenir les performances recherchées au niveau du rendement et de pouvoir dégager suffisamment de place pour loger un porte-bidon à l’intérieur du triangle avant. Comme vous pouviez vous y attendre, les Process sont équipés de roulements à tous les points de pivot, y compris des roulements surdimensionnés de 20 mm sur les pivots principaux et sur la nouvelle biellette en 3 parties.



Le cadre carbone possède un passage des câbles en interne, avec une trappe d’accès comme sur les Hei Hei Trail, tandis que les cadres en aluminium utilisent un routage externe. Tous les modèles disposent de bases en aluminium pour une plus grande résistance. Nous avons travaillé dur pour améliorer les caractéristiques du cadre sans sacrifier ce qui a fait le succès du Process.


Video – Kona Process G2 : Histoire du développement et details techniques

Le chef de produit Kona Ian Schmitt nous plonge dans le développement et les details techniques du Process G2 :

Trois cadres, Deux tailles de roues, Sept nouveaux Process

Avec deux matériaux et deux tailles de roues couvrant trois plates-formes distinctes, le Process G2 offre une belle gamme de trail-bikes agressifs. Les Process 153 27.5 et 29 pouces partagent la même géométrie et les mêmes équipements. Le Process 165 est plus orienté descente, mais il grimpe étonnamment bien pour un vélo avec un tel débattement. Le Process 153 27.5 carbone et aluminium, le 153 29 et le 165 sont disponibles en kit cadres.

 

Process 153 27.5

Process 153 CR/DL 27.5

Process 153 CR 27.5

Process 153 AL/DL 27.5

Process 153 AL 27.5

Process 153 29

Process 153 AL/DL 29

Process 153 AL 29

Process 165 27.5

Process 165

Le tout nouveau Process G2 est disponible dès maintenant dans votre shop ou en ligne.

Pour tous les détails sur le nouveau Process, connectez-vous sur Konaworld.com et découvrez toutes les caractéristiques du vélo sur la page dédiée.

______________________________________________________________

Video – Process G2 : Sea to Sky with Rhys Verner

Pour le lancement du Process G2, le pro rider Kona Rhys Verner a eu la lourde tâche de pousser le vélo dans ses retranchements.

Découvrez le reportage photos complet et toute l’histoire du film Sea to Sky avec Rhys et le nouveau Process G2.