Caveman-web Back in 2007, we here at the shop marveled at the value of the Dew Deluxe for $600. At the time, Trek’s “Portland” model was picking all the low-hanging fruit around town, and we thought, “Kona needs a drop-handlebar, disc-equipped, commuter-style road bike—but at half the cost!” So, the prototype Dew Drop was born, and it worked and rode quite well. We sourced more bars, STI levers, and road-compatible disc brakes—along with a few other necessary parts–at the best prices we could find for our first production run. The retail price was $950, and they sure sold.

2009 Dew Drop is going for a bargain ($600) at a US dealer near you

2009 Dew Drop is going for a bargain ($600) at a US dealer near you

Less than two years later, Kona birthed the official “Dew Drop” and killed our price by $150 bucks! Better, it was a sweet, dark cherry red, and later in the season it’d be joined by its beautiful SE-Black sibling. Kona’s crack general sales manager Kevin “The Grinder” Noble loves ’em so much that he’s letting us sell the Dew Drop for $600—that’s 25%-off the $800 MSRP. And you get to choose your color.

But it’s not about the color, of course. Full fenders and front and rear racks fit easily to the bike. We like the Topeak “Explorer Disc” rear rack ($50)—a perfect fit given the Avid BB7 brakes. The inexpensive SKS “Commuter 45” fenders ($30) fit without any modification. The Dew Drop can do it all—it’s an all-weather, everyday work-horse. It even takes knobbies, so take it off-road—the double-wall rims are bomber.

The eight-speed Shimano drivetrain means more metal lasts longer. The stock range from the low-end 30x34t to the high-end 52x11t gear doesn’t leave anybody behind anywhere. The thumb-button integrated shifters are, yes, Shimano’s cheapest but, more important, they’re the most reliable. Add Tektro ‘cross levers to Kona’s swept-back bar for about $50 installed, and you’re done. I mean, what’s left—other than to ride?