Honzo CR

Say Hello to the 2019 Honzos!

The 2019 Honzos have arrived. It’s the hardtail that redefined hardtails.

Throw all of mountain biking’s buzzwords in a blender and you get Honzo: capable, lively, playful, nimble, badass- you get the point. It’s not untrue to say the Honzo started something big. It’s been a head-turner from day one because it’s been radically different since its inception. It’s the hardtail that redefined how we design all of our bikes and has become the gold standard for hardtails. It’s our desert island bike. With three different frame materials and builds for different budgets, there’s a Honzo for everyone.

Honzo CR

 

 

 

The Honzo CR is for the discerning customer who knows exactly what they want in a bike. Kona’s Carbon Trail frame is light and stiff and rides predictably. A 120mm RockShox RC Revelation Fork, SRAM Level T brakes, a KS Lev dropper, and Maxxis rubber create quite the compelling package in this super fun trail bike.

 

 

Honzo DL

 

The Honzo DL is the bike for people that are looking to get serious about their riding. It’s pure mountain bike geometry in a sweet hardtail package. Just enough suspension to keep things moving along on the trail, but nimble, fast and easy to throw around, the Honzo is a total dream for the person looking for something playful.

 

Honzo

 

The Honzo is the bike that redefined Kona’s goal to push the limits and do something radically different. From biking to work to getting creative in the bike park the Honzo inspires serious fun. A 120mm RockShox Recon fork, SRAM NX 11 speed drivetrain, and Shimano hydraulic disc brakes equal the perfect blend of fun and fast.

 

We previously announced our birthday bike which is our 2019 Honzo ST. But… just in case you missed it, here it is!

For all of the hot new 2019 bikes, be sure to check out Konaworld.com!

Koopmans Wins 3 Nations Cup!

XCO Erezee

Erezee is a little village in the Belgian Ardennes. The course was about 4.5km with 195hm and lots of rocks and roots. Although nowadays most of the cross-country courses are handmade by track builders, in Erezee the track was 100% made by mother nature herself.

Since Lotte is combining her medical studies with cycling, there was no time to explore the course earlier than on the race day itself. She was only able to do one lap on the course before the sound of the start shot echoed through the fields.

After a little start climb, Lotte was the third into the forest. First, there came a descent and she tried to stay close to the top to riders in the field. On the first very slippery climb she managed to overtake both riders in front of her and start her solo race. Every lap the gap grew wider and wider. In the meantime, the sun was starting to shine and the course dried up a bit. Both the climbs and descent went faster and after 1.5hr race she crossed the finish line more than five minutes ahead of the second place finisher! Nicknamed, “climbing goat Koopmans” by the Dutch press, Lotte and the team are very happy and satisfied with the result.

Lotte races on the Kona Honzo CR Race, which she loves. Her bike is very light and because the geometry is also a bit like a trail bike, she can attack the downhills too.

Marathon Rhens

Every year the Kona LTD Teams travel to Germany to participate in the Marathon of Rhens. It is about 80km and 2400 meters of elevation.

Laura and Dave just came from the wedding of Laura’s younger brother. They stayed in a hotel near Rhens, since Laura won the marathon last year and they got one night in a very luxury hotel, with a sauna and golf course. Lucky for them, the hotel owner is Mister Haribo… so lots of Haribo candy everywhere!

Laura had a solid start but after 25km she felt that her legs needed their own pace and she decided to just enjoy the race and the beautiful German views. After almost 4 hours of racing and a caffeine gel her legs finally found strength and she was able to race an amazing final. She finished third in her category.

For Dave, in contrast, the sugar of the candies in the hotel seemed to power his legs and he had a great race!

Roy loves this kind of marathon with a lot of gravel roads and long climbs. He gave it his all on both climbs and descents. He ended 12th overall in a very strong and big field of elite men!

Even Karin enjoyed the trails. In the beginning, she was struggling a bit with the legs but in the end, she overtook a lot of riders, both men and women!

 

Dirt Rag’s Ode the Honzo CR Trail: “Long, Low and Slack. It Works.”

Dirt Rag‘s Scott Williams has finished testing the Honzo CR Trail DL and it seems he gets it “Long, low and slack. It works. “ From the component spec to the frame details to the ride characteristics, Scott absolutely loved the Honzo CR Trail.

“There have only been two bikes that I immediately felt at home on, my personal bike being one of them and now this Honzo CR Trail DL.”

Read Scott’s complete review at Dirt Rag or right here as a PDF. 20170406-Kona_Honzo_CR-11

Cory Wallace Acclimatizes in Nepal for the Yak Attack Stage Race

Words and photos by Cory Wallace.

The 11-day Yak Attack stage race is the highest mountain bike race on Earth as it traverses through Nepal’s grand Himalayan mountain range. It starts out on the World famous Annapurna trek, taking us up over Thorong La pass at 5416 m. From there we’ll drop down to 4000 m and head into the tourist restricted area of the Upper Mustang Valley, eventually reaching the border of Tibet. Over the course of the race, 8.5 of the 10 stages will be between 3500 m and 5416 m with the temperatures anywhere between +25 and -20 degrees celsius. It’s part race but more so a proper mountain adventure!

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In 2014 I came here unprepared and had my ass handed to me, getting sick on the first day and never recovering. The combination of turbulent food, rough living conditions, high altitude and tough riding has meant the local Nepali riders have dominated the race winning every one of the 9 previous editions. As far as a race goes, it’s the most scenic MTB race I’ve been to in the world, and per kilometre one of the toughest. The days are short – averaging 35-45 km – but they can be deceptive, often requiring some hike a bike, extremely rough and unforgiving terrain, cold temperatures and thin air.

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Trying to ride at 3000-5400 m above sea level slows things down considerably. The oxygen level of the air is still the same as sea level at around 22%, but there is less air being inhaled with every breath as there’s less pressure in the atmosphere. By the time we hit 3000 m the effective oxygen will be cut down to 14.5% and by the time we hit the top of Throng La Pass at 5416 m it will be around 10.7% – half of what we take in at sea level. This means a lot of long slow breaths and trying to diesel our way through the days instead of bursting efforts which would surely leave us gasping for air and in a world of hurt.

Since the MTB Himalaya race ended in India, I set up base camp in the Indian mountains at 1950 m for 2 weeks, with 3 nights up around 2800 m. 1950 m is on the cusp of being good for acclimatization, as 2200-2600 m seems to be the desirable level but after having a decent crash, it seemed smarter to stay down a bit lower in higher oxygen levels to help with the recovery. Since coming to Nepal my buddy Peter Butt and I headed up onto the race course and stayed in the town of Manang for 5 nights at 3500 m. The first 3 days we felt the effects of the altitude as our heart rates went up and our sleeps were disturbed as our bodies acclimatized. By the fourth night our bodies seemed to have come around and everything shifted back to normal although our rides during the day left us gasping for air, especially once we hit over 4000 m!

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The lead up to the race has been a real experiment and will be interesting to see if the pre-altitude training has any positive effect once we start racing. One thing which has been a bonus has been living in the India-Nepal region for the last 6 weeks getting used to the sketchy food/water and adapting to the cultural differences. It’s starting to feel a bit like home which should help control these Nepali mountain goats in the coming days. Theres also a handful of fast foreigners here which are wildcards and should keep the race interesting as it always a battle trying to race over here.

Kona has a new distributor in Nepal and one of their shops, Pancbike, helped sort out some last minute gear and tuned up my bike. It’s great to see the Kona brand come into the Nepalese market as these guys have some perfect terrain for mountain biking and they certainly need bikes which are durable and can take a beating!

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Stage 1 of the Yak Attack was a bit of a shocker with a flat tire just before the start and one at the finish. In between the body was running really hot and misfiring after feeling pretty good in the lead up. It seems the curse of the Yak Attack from 2014 is still lingering around but there are ten more days to go. Hopefully things will turn around and I’ll finally crush this demon. After this it’s officialy game over on what has been a solid 12 month race season starting all the way back in Costa Rica last December.

With the most recent update, Cory is sitting in 1st overall after five days’ racing. Looks like the acclimatization is paying off! Good luck Cory and we look forward to hearing about the rest of the Yak Attack!

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The Last Wave – Spencer Paxson

We roared across the land like a spandex-clad apocalypse, the leaves whirling into the air in our wake, for we’d sucked the air out of the forest and into our own little vortex, into our lungs to fuel our legs to push harder, and harder still, chests heaving like bellows, and we weren’t so much on wheels as we were just flying, gravity an afterthought, and still we pushed for more, like we wanted to burn our tires clean off our bikes, which shuddered and hissed and left arched slashes through the sandy soil. Behind us the leaves settled back down onto the dirt path and the orange and red Michigan forest was still, finally. We were the last wave of the day.

The square red signs with white numbers counted down the what couldn’t come quickly enough, or was about to arrive too soon, the finish of this race, the 27th Iceman Cometh Challenge. We started as a group of 92, local heroes and characters, Olympians and World Tour demigods, keeners all of us. And now, a short 80 minutes in, just 5 km to go, 38 km behind us, and there were ten of us, following the same track that 5,000 other racers had done earlier.

One rider was off the front and out of sight, the rest of us chasing and racing for second. One of us would be the first to launch a final attack and it would be too soon, too soon before the line where it counted to cross first, and the rest would scurry around the miscalculation and, like pinballs astray, we would zigzag up the final steep hill, squinting out of pain and the afternoon sun glinting through the trees, the scent and sensation of beer particles spraying out of the mouths of the screaming crowd. Across the line, we’ve finished in some order or other, screeching to a smoldering halt. Any longer and we would have been spewing blood out our eyes.

Released from our manic state, we’re suddenly all smiles and high fives, catching our breath, talking about this race, unique and bigger than any other mountain bike race in the country, all the way up here in northern Michigan in November. I was the one in the lead group who had gone too soon, and the cold beer was dulling the sting of my misjudgment and missing out on a larger portion of the $32,000 up for grabs amongst the top-10. In just under 85 minutes of racing, the winner had just made around $70 per minute, me around $4.16.

But money mattered less with each recounting of the day, and this weekend spent with new friends from Traverse City and the Einstein Bicycles shop. Over more beer and pizza and day-old scones back at the shop, we joked and talked bikes. The day was already good history, a good notch in each person’s own folklore. It felt good to be a part of it and this buoyant sector of the cycling community. From the first wave to the last, it’s what it’s all about.

Spencer Paxson is a Kona Endurance Team rider. Follow his daily updates on Instagram and his longer pieces on Blogspot

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Post-race reflection. Photo by Cody Sovis of Einstein Cycles.

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Spencer raced the Iceman Cometh on his Honzo CR Race. Photo by MarathonFoto.

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